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  1.  49
    Voluntary Active Euthanasia and the Nurse: A Comparison of Japanese and Australian Nurses.Noritoshi Tanida, Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Shizuko K. Nagata, Tsuguya Fukui, Yasuji Yamazaki & Helga Kuhse - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (3):313-322.
    Although euthanasia has been a pressing ethical and public issue, empirical data are lacking in Japan. We aimed to explore Japanese nurses’ attitudes to patients’ requests for euthanasia and to estimate the proportion of nurses who have taken active steps to hasten death. A postal survey was conducted between October and December 1999 among all nurse members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine, using a self-administered questionnaire based on the one used in a previous survey with Australian nurses in (...)
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  2.  52
    Doctors' and Nurses' Attitudes Towards and Experiences of Voluntary Euthanasia: Survey of Members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Shizuko K. Nagata, Noritoshi Tanida & Yasuji Yamazaki - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):324-330.
    Objective—To demonstrate Japanese doctors' and nurses' attitudes towards and practices of voluntary euthanasia (VE) and to compare their attitudes and practices in this regard. Design—Postal survey, conducted between October and December 1999, using a self-administered questionnaire.Participants—All doctor members and nurse members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Main outcome measure—Doctors' and nurses' attitude towards and practices of VE.Results—We received 366 completed questionnaires from 642 doctors surveyed (response rate, 58%) and 145 from 217 nurses surveyed (68%). A total of 54% (95% (...)
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  3.  6
    Should We Aim to Create a Perfect Healthy Utopia? Discussions of Ethical Issues Surrounding the World of Project Itoh’s Harmony.Atsushi Asai, Taketoshi Okita, Motoki Ohnishi & Seiji Bito - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (6):3249-3270.
    To consider whether or not we should aim to create a perfect healthy utopia on Earth, we focus on the SF novel Harmony, written by Japanese writer Project Ito, and analyze various issues in the world established in the novel from a bioethical standpoint. In the world depicted in Harmony, preserving health and life is a top priority. Super-medicine is realized through highly advanced medical technologies. Citizens in Harmony are required to strictly control themselves to achieve perfect health and must (...)
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  4.  22
    Hope for the Best and Prepare for the Worst: Ethical Concerns Related to the Introduction of Healthcare Artificial Intelligence.Atsuchi Asai, Taketoshi Okita, Aya Enzo, Motoki Ohnishi & Seiji Bito - 2019 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 29 (2):64-70.
    Background: The introduction of healthcare AI to society as well as the clinical setting will improve individual health statuses and increase the possible medical choices. AI can be, however, regarded as a double-edged sword that might cause medically and socially undesirable situations. In this paper, we attempt to predict several negative situations that may be faced by healthcare professionals, patients and citizens in the healthcare setting, and our society as a whole. Discussion: We would argue that physicians abuse healthcare AI (...)
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  5.  45
    Focus Group Interviews Examining Attitudes Towards Medical Research Among the Japanese: A Qualitative Study.Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Etsuyo Nishigaki, Miho Sekimoto, Shunichi Fukuhara & Tsuguya Fukui - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (5):448–470.
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  6.  2
    Physician Use of the Phrase “Due to Old Age” to Address Complaints of Elderly Symptoms in Japanese Medical Settings: The Merits and Drawbacks.Atsushi Asai, Taketoshi Okita, Masashi Tanaka, Seiji Bito & Motoki Ohnishi - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (1):14-21.
    In everyday medical settings in Japan, physicians occasionally tell an elderly patient that their symptoms are “due to old age,” and there is some concern that patient care might be negatively impacted as a result. That said, as this phrase can have multiple connotations and meanings, there are certain instances in which the use of this phrase may not necessarily be indicative of ageism, or prejudice against the elderly. One of the goals in medical care is to address pain and (...)
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  7.  12
    Euthanasia and the Family: An Analysis of Japanese Doctors’ Reactions to Demands for Voluntary Euthanasia.Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Akemi Kariya, Shizuko K. Nagata, Tsuguya Fukui, Noritoshi Tanida, Yasuji Yamazaki & Helga Kuhse - 2001 - Monash Bioethics Review 20 (3):21-37.
    What should Japanese doctors do when asked by a patient for active voluntary euthanasia, when the family wants aggressive treatment to continue? In this paper, we present the results of a questionnaire survey of 366 Japanese doctors, who were asked how they would act in a hypothetical situation of this kind, and how they would justify their decision, 23% of respondents said they would act on the patient’s wishes, and provided reasons for their view; 54% said they would not practice (...)
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