13 found
Order:
See also
Joshua Parker
University of Manchester
  1.  8
    Barriers to green inhaler prescribing: ethical issues in environmentally sustainable clinical practice.Joshua Parker - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (2):92-98.
    The National Health Service (NHS) was the first healthcare system globally to declare ambitions to become net carbon zero. To achieve this, a shift away from metered-dose inhalers which contain powerful greenhouse gases is necessary. Many patients can use dry powder inhalers which do not contain greenhouse gases and are equally effective at managing respiratory disease. This paper discusses the ethical issues that arise as the NHS attempts to mitigate climate change. Two ethical issues that pose a barrier to moving (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  2.  14
    The ethical case for non-directed postmortem sperm donation.Nathan Hodson & Joshua Parker - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):489-492.
    In this article we outline and defend the concept of voluntary non-directed postmortem sperm donation. This approach offers a potential means of increasing the quantity and heterogeneity of donor sperm. This is pertinent given the present context of a donor sperm shortage in the UK. Beyond making the case that it is technically feasible for dead men to donate their sperm for use in reproduction, we argue that this is ethically permissible. The inability to access donor sperm and the suffering (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3.  8
    Postmortem non-directed sperm donation: quality matters.Joshua Parker & Nathan Hodson - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):263-264.
    In our paper ‘The ethical case for non-directed postmortem sperm donation’ we argued that it would be ethical for men to donate sperm after death for use by strangers. In their thoughtful response Fredrick and Ben Kroon lay out practical concerns regarding our proposal. They raise issues regarding the quality of sperm collected postmortem based on empirical studies. Second, they claim that concerns about quality would make women unlikely to use sperm collected after death. In this response we explore issues (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  21
    Junior doctors and moral exploitation.Joshua Parker - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (9):571-574.
    In this paper I argue that junior doctors are morally exploited. Moral exploitation occurs where an individual’s vulnerability is used to compel them to take on additional moral burdens. These might include additional moral responsibility, making weighty moral decisions and shouldering the consequent emotions. Key to the concept of exploitation is vulnerability and here I build on Rosalind McDougall’s work on the key roles of junior doctors to show how these leave them open to moral exploitation by restricting their reasonable (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5.  52
    Deference or critical engagement: How should healthcare practitioners use Clinical Ethics Guidance?Ben Davies & Joshua Parker - forthcoming - Monash Bioethics Review:1-15.
    Healthcare practitioners have access to a range of ethical guidance. However, the normative role of this guidance in ethical decision-making is underexplored. This paper considers two ways that healthcare practitioners could approach ethics guidance. We first outline the idea of deference to ethics guidance, showing how an attitude of deference raises three key problems: moral value; moral understanding; and moral error. Drawing on philosophical literature, we then advocate an alternative framing of ethics guidance as a form of moral testimony by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Physician, heal thyself: Do doctors have a responsibility to practise self-care?Joshua Parker & Ben Davies - 2024 - In Ben Davies, Gabriel De Marco, Neil Levy & Julian Savulescu (eds.), Responsibility and Healthcare. Oxford University Press USA.
    Burnout among health professionals is at epidemic proportions. In response, many health institutions have emphasised the importance of self-care, relying particularly on the idea that doctors who are burned out provide worse care for their patients. Although not made explicit, this suggests that doctors might have a responsibility to their patients (and perhaps others) to practice self-care. This chapter explores the potential grounds for such an obligation. We suggest that while there is potential for a limited obligation of self-care, institutional (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. No Blame No Gain? From a No Blame Culture to a Responsibility Culture in Medicine.Joshua Parker & Ben Davies - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (4):646-660.
    Healthcare systems need to consider not only how to prevent error, but how to respond to errors when they occur. In the United Kingdom’s National Health Service, one strand of this latter response is the ‘No Blame Culture’, which draws attention from individuals and towards systems in the process of understanding an error. Defences of the No Blame Culture typically fail to distinguish between blaming someone and holding them responsible. This article argues for a ‘responsibility culture’, where healthcare professionals are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  10
    Terrible choices in the septic child: a response to the PALOH trial round table authors.Joshua Parker & David Wright - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (2):114-116.
    In this response article, we challenge a core assumption that lies at the centre of a round table discussion regarding the Pharmacogenetics to Avoid Loss of Hearing trial. The round table regards a genetic test for a variant that increases the risk of deafness if a carrier is given the antibiotic gentamicin. The idea is that rapid testing can identify neonates at risk, providing an opportunity to prevent giving an antibiotic that might cause deafness. We challenge the assumption that a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  9
    Too much medicine: not enough trust? A response.Joshua Parker - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):746-747.
    In their paper ’Too much medicine: not enough trust?' Zoë Fritz and Richard Holton explore the connection between trust and overtreatment and overinvestigation. Whilst their paper is insightful, here I argue that much more could be made of a doctor’s trust and how this exacerbates overtreatment and overinvestigation. By taking Fritz and Holton’s view of trust as having ‘our best interests at heart’ as my starting point, I argue that doctor’s do not always trust that patients or the system has (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  14
    Translational or translationable? A call for ethno‐immersion in (empirical) bioethics research.Jordan A. Parsons, Harleen Kaur Johal, Joshua Parker & Elizabeth Chloe Romanis - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):252-261.
    The shift towards "empirical bioethics" was largely triggered by a recognition that stakeholders' views and experiences are vital in ethical analysis where one hopes to produce practicable recommendations. Such perspectives can provide a rich resource in bioethics scholarship, perhaps challenging the researcher's perspective. However, overreliance on a picture painted by a group of research participants—or on pre‐existing literature in that field—can lead to a biased view of a given context, as the subjectivity of data generated in these ways cannot (and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  9
    How should institutions help clinicians to practise greener anaesthesia: first-order and second-order responsibilities to practice sustainably.Joshua Parker, Nathan Hodson, Paul Young & Clifford Shelton - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    There is a need for all industries, including healthcare, to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. In anaesthetic practice, this not only requires a reduction in resource use and waste, but also a shift away from inhaled anaesthetic gases and towards alternatives with a lower carbon footprint. As inhalational anaesthesia produces greenhouse gas emissions at the point of use, achieving sustainable anaesthetic practice involves individual practitioner behaviour change. However, changing the practice of healthcare professionals raises potential ethical issues. The purpose of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  11
    The scope of patient, healthcare professional and healthcare systems responsibilities to reduce the carbon footprint of inhalers: a response to commentaries.Joshua Parker - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (3):187-188.
    I am grateful for these four wide-ranging and incisive commentaries on my paper discussing the ethical issues that arise when we consider the carbon footprint of inhalers.1 As I am unable to address every point raised, instead I focus on what I take to be the common thread running through these papers. Each response has something to say regarding the scope of healthcare’s responsibility to mitigate climate change. This can be explored at the intuitional or structural level, or at the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  16
    Doctors as appointed fiduciaries: A supplemental model for medical decision-making.Ben Davies & Joshua Parker - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):23-33.
    How should we respond to patients who do not wish to take on the responsibility and burdens of making decisions about their own care? In this paper, we argue that existing models of decision-making in modern healthcare are ill-equipped to cope with such patients and should be supplemented by an “appointed fiduciary” model where decision-making authority is formally transferred to a medical professional. Healthcare decisions are often complex and for patients can come at time of vulnerability. While this does not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark