17 found
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  1. How simulations fail.Patrick Grim, Robert Rosenberger, Adam Rosenfeld, Brian Anderson & Robb E. Eason - 2011 - Synthese 190 (12):2367-2390.
    ‘The problem with simulations is that they are doomed to succeed.’ So runs a common criticism of simulations—that they can be used to ‘prove’ anything and are thus of little or no scientific value. While this particular objection represents a minority view, especially among those who work with simulations in a scientific context, it raises a difficult question: what standards should we use to differentiate a simulation that fails from one that succeeds? In this paper we build on a structural (...)
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  2.  9
    Reward learning biases the direction of saccades.Ming-Ray Liao & Brian A. Anderson - 2020 - Cognition 196:104145.
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  3.  11
    Mechanisms of value-learning in the guidance of spatial attention.Brian A. Anderson & Haena Kim - 2018 - Cognition 178 (C):26-36.
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  4.  35
    Reward predictions bias attentional selection.Brian A. Anderson, Patryk A. Laurent & Steven Yantis - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  5. The attention habit: how reward learning shapes attentional selection.A. Anderson, Brian - 2015 - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1:24-39.
    There is growing consensus that reward plays an important role in the control of attention. Until recently, reward was thought to influence attention indirectly by modulating task-specific motivation and its effects on voluntary control over selection. Such an account was consistent with the goal-directed (endogenous) versus stimulus-driven (exogenous) framework that had long dominated the field of attention research. Now, a different perspective is emerging. Demonstrations that previously reward-associated stimuli can automatically capture attention even when physically inconspicuous and task-irrelevant challenge previously (...)
     
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  6.  21
    Counterintuitive effects of negative social feedback on attention.Brian A. Anderson - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  7. Ayahuasca as Antidepressant? Psychedelics and Styles of Reasoning in Psychiatry.Brian T. Anderson - 2012 - Anthropology of Consciousness 23 (1):44-59.
    There is a growing interest among scientists and the lay public alike in using the South American psychedelic brew, ayahuasca, to treat psychiatric disorders like depression and anxiety. Such a practice is controversial due to a style of reasoning within conventional psychiatry that sees psychedelic-induced modified states of consciousness as pathological. This article analyzes the academic literature on ayahuasca's psychological effects to determine how this style of reasoning is shaping formal scientific discourse on ayahuasca's therapeutic potential as a treatment for (...)
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  8.  30
    Information Processing Biases in the Brain: Implications for Decision-Making and Self-Governance.Anthony W. Sali, Brian A. Anderson & Susan M. Courtney - 2016 - Neuroethics 11 (3):259-271.
    To make behavioral choices that are in line with our goals and our moral beliefs, we need to gather and consider information about our current situation. Most information present in our environment is not relevant to the choices we need or would want to make and thus could interfere with our ability to behave in ways that reflect our underlying values. Certain sources of information could even lead us to make choices we later regret, and thus it would be beneficial (...)
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  9. Psychedelic Psychotherapy.Brian Anderson - 2006 - Penn Bioethics Journal 2 (1).
     
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  10. Mill on Bentham: From ideology to humanized utilitarianism.Brian A. Anderson - 1983 - History of Political Thought 4 (2):341-356.
  11.  3
    Oculomotor feedback rapidly reduces overt attentional capture.Brian A. Anderson & Lana Mrkonja - 2021 - Cognition 217 (C):104917.
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  12. Raymond Aron and the Defence of Political Reason.Brian C. Anderson - 1997 - Dissertation, University of Ottawa (Canada)
     
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  13.  2
    Raymond Aron: The Recovery of the Political.Brian C. Anderson - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This concise and penetrating analysis introduces students to the life and thought of one of the giants of twentieth-century French intellectual life. Portraying Raymond Aron as a great defender of reason, moderation, and political sobriety in an era dominated by ideological fervor and philosophical fashion, Brian Anderson demonstrates the centrality of political reason to Aron's philosophy of history, his critique of ideological thinking, his meditations on the perennial problems of peace and war, and the nature of conservative liberalism.
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  14.  4
    Statistical learning facilitates the strategic use of attentional control.Andrew Clement & Brian A. Anderson - 2023 - Cognition 239 (C):105536.
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  15.  2
    Observational learning of threat-related attentional bias.Laurent Grégoire, Mirela Dubravac, Kirsten Moore, Namgyun Kim & Brian A. Anderson - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion.
    Attentional bias to threat has been almost exclusively examined after participants experienced repeated pairings between a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US). This study aimed to determine whether threat-related attentional capture can result from observational learning, when participants acquire knowledge of the aversive qualities of a stimulus without themselves experiencing aversive outcomes. Non-clinical young-adult participants (N = 38) first watched a video of an individual (the demonstrator) performing a Pavlovian conditioning task in which one colour was paired (...)
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  16.  8
    Combined influence of valence and statistical learning on the control of attention: Evidence for independent sources of bias.Haena Kim & Brian A. Anderson - 2021 - Cognition 208 (C):104554.
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  17. Modernity, Aesthetics, and the Quest for Political Consensus. [REVIEW]Brian Anderson - 1996 - Interpretation 23 (3):493-503.
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