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  1.  40
    How Can a Taxonomy of Stances Help Clarify Classical Debates on Scientific Change?Hakob Barseghyan & Jamie Shaw - 2017 - Philosophies 2 (4):24.
    In this paper, we demonstrate how a systematic taxonomy of stances can help elucidate two classic debates of the historical turn—the Lakatos–Feyerabend debate concerning theory rejection and the Feyerabend–Kuhn debate about pluralism during normal science. We contend that Kuhn, Feyerabend, and Lakatos were often talking at cross-purposes due to the lack of an agreed upon taxonomy of stances. Specifically, we provide three distinct stances that scientists take towards theories: acceptance of a theory as the best available description of its domain, (...)
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  2.  4
    The Laws of Scientific Change.Hakob Barseghyan - 2015 - Cham: Imprint: Springer.
    This book systematically creates a general descriptive theory of scientific change that explains the mechanics of changes in both scientific theories and the methods of their assessment. It was once believed that, while scientific theories change through time, their change itself is governed by a fixed method of science. Nowadays we know that there is no such thing as an unchangeable method of science; the criteria employed by scientists in theory evaluation also change through time. But if that is so, (...)
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  3.  24
    Question pursuit as an epistemic stance.Hakob Barseghyan - 2022 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 94 (C):112-120.
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  4. A Diagrammatic Notation for Visualizing Epistemic Entities and Relations.Kye Palider, Ameer Sarwar, Hakob Barseghyan, Paul Patton, Julia Da Silva, Torin Doppelt, Nichole Levesley, Jessica Rapson, Jamie Shaw, Yifang Zhang & Amna Zulfiqar - 2021 - Scientonomy 4:87–139.
    This paper presents a diagrammatic notation for visualizing epistemic entities and relations. The notation was created during the Visualizing Worldviews project funded by the University of Toronto’s Jackman Humanities Institute and has been further developed by the scholars participating in the university’s Research Opportunity Program. Since any systematic diagrammatic notation should be based on a solid ontology of the respective domain, we first outline the current state of the scientonomic ontology. We then proceed to providing diagrammatic tools for visualizing the (...)
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  5.  25
    Selection, presentism, and pluralist history.Hakob Barseghyan - 2022 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 92 (C):60-70.
    Despite a growing body of literature that attempts to draw a line between legitimate and illegitimate forms of presentism in academic history, ‘avoid presentism’ is still often preached as the first rule of historiography. Distinct from other forms of presentism is selective presentism – the practice of taking some present-day activity, event, idea, or problem as a starting point in our selection of historical facts. Throughout the paper I examine the relation of some of the most popular selection criteria – (...)
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  6. Feyerabend's general theory of scientific change.Hakob Barseghyan - 2021 - In Karim Bschir & Jamie Shaw (eds.), Interpreting Feyerabend: Critical Essays. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  7.  10
    Scientonomy: The Challenges of Constructing a Theory of Scientific Change.Hakob Barseghyan, Jamie Shaw, Paul Edward Patton & Gregory Rupik (eds.) - 2021 - Wilmington: Vernon Press.
    During the so-called 'historical turn' in the philosophy of science, philosophers and historians boldly argued for general patterns throughout the history of science. From Kuhn's landmark "Structure of Scientific Revolutions" until the "Scrutinizing Science" project led by Larry Laudan, there was optimism that there could be a general theoretical approach to understanding the process of scientific change. This optimism gradually faded as historians and philosophers began to focus on the details of specific case studies located within idiosyncratic historical, cultural, and (...)
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