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  1.  67
    The development of abstract syntax: Evidence from structural priming and the lexical boost.Caroline F. Rowland, Franklin Chang, Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Elena Vm Lieven - 2012 - Cognition 125 (1):49-63.
  2.  32
    The effect of verb semantic class and verb frequency (entrenchment) on children’s and adults’ graded judgements of argument-structure overgeneralization errors.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine, Caroline F. Rowland & Chris R. Young - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):87-129.
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  3.  20
    The island status of clausal complements: Evidence in favor of an information structure explanation.Ben Ambridge & Adele E. Goldberg - 2008 - Cognitive Linguistics 19 (3).
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  4.  43
    Semantics versus statistics in the retreat from locative overgeneralization errors.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2012 - Cognition 123 (2):260-279.
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  5.  21
    Is Passive Syntax Semantically Constrained? Evidence From Adult Grammaticality Judgment and Comprehension Studies.Ben Ambridge, Amy Bidgood, Julian M. Pine, Caroline F. Rowland & Daniel Freudenthal - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):1435-1459.
    To explain the phenomenon that certain English verbs resist passivization, Pinker proposed a semantic constraint on the passive in the adult grammar: The greater the extent to which a verb denotes an action where a patient is affected or acted upon, the greater the extent to which it is compatible with the passive. However, a number of comprehension and production priming studies have cast doubt upon this claim, finding no difference between highly affecting agent-patient/theme-experiencer passives and non-actional experiencer theme passives. (...)
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  6.  33
    An Elicited‐Production Study of Inflectional Verb Morphology in Child Finnish.Sanna H. M. Räsänen, Ben Ambridge & Julian M. Pine - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7):1704-1738.
    Many generativist accounts argue for very early knowledge of inflection on the basis of very low rates of person/number marking errors in young children's speech. However, studies of Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese have revealed that these low overall error rates actually hide important differences across the verb paradigm. The present study investigated children's production of person/number marked verbs by eliciting present tense verb forms from 82 native Finnish-speaking children aged 2;2–4;8 years. Four main findings were observed: Rates of person/number marking (...)
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  7.  46
    A Semantics‐Based Approach to the “No Negative Evidence” Problem.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine, Caroline F. Rowland, Rebecca L. Jones & Victoria Clark - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (7):1301-1316.
    Previous studies have shown that children retreat from argument‐structure overgeneralization errors (e.g., *Don’t giggle me) by inferring that frequently encountered verbs are unlikely to be grammatical in unattested constructions, and by making use of syntax‐semantics correspondences (e.g., verbs denoting internally caused actions such as giggling cannot normally be used causatively). The present study tested a new account based on a unitary learning mechanism that combines both of these processes. Seventy‐two participants (ages 5–6, 9–10, and adults) rated overgeneralization errors with higher (...)
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  8.  35
    Is Structure Dependence an Innate Constraint? New Experimental Evidence From Children's Complex-Question Production.Ben Ambridge, Caroline F. Rowland & Julian M. Pine - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (1):222-255.
  9.  31
    The crosslinguistic acquisition of sentence structure: Computational modeling and grammaticality judgments from adult and child speakers of English, Japanese, Hindi, Hebrew and K'iche'.Ben Ambridge, Tomoko Tatsumi, Laura Doherty, Ramya Maitreyee, Colin Bannard, Soumitra Samanta, Stewart McCauley, Inbal Arnon, Shira Zicherman, Dani Bekman, Amir Efrati, Ruth Berman, Bhuvana Narasimhan, Dipti Misra Sharma, Rukmini Bhaya Nair, Kumiko Fukumura, Seth Campbell, Clifton Pye, Pedro Mateo Pedro, Sindy Fabiola Can Pixabaj, Mario Marroquín Pelíz & Margarita Julajuj Mendoza - 2020 - Cognition 202 (C):104310.
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  10.  59
    Children use verb semantics to retreat from overgeneralization errors: A novel verb grammaticality judgment study.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (2):303-323.
    Whilst certain verbs may appear in both the intransitive inchoative and the transitive causative constructions (The ball rolled/The man rolled the ball), others may appear in only the former (The man laughed/*The joke laughed the man). Some accounts argue that children acquire these restrictions using only (or mainly) statistical learning mechanisms such as entrenchment and pre-emption. Others have argued that verb semantics are also important. To test these competing accounts, adults (Experiment 1) and children aged 5–6 and 9–10 (Experiment 2) (...)
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  11.  87
    How Do Children Restrict Their Linguistic Generalizations? An (Un‐)Grammaticality Judgment Study.Ben Ambridge - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (3):508-543.
    A paradox at the heart of language acquisition research is that, to achieve adult-like competence, children must acquire the ability to generalize verbs into non-attested structures, while avoiding utterances that are deemed ungrammatical by native speakers. For example, children must learn that, to denote the reversal of an action, un- can be added to many verbs, but not all (e.g., roll/unroll; close/*unclose). This study compared theoretical accounts of how this is done. Children aged 5–6 (N = 18), 9–10 (N = (...)
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  12.  26
    Balancing information-structure and semantic constraints on construction choice: building a computational model of passive and passive-like constructions in Mandarin Chinese.Ben Ambridge & Li Liu - 2021 - Cognitive Linguistics 32 (3):349-388.
    A central tenet of cognitive linguistics is that adults’ knowledge of language consists of a structured inventory of constructions, including various two-argument constructions such as the active, the passive and “fronting” constructions. But how do speakers choose which construction to use for a particular utterance, given constraints such as discourse/information structure and the semantic fit between verb and construction? The goal of the present study was to build a computational model of this phenomenon for two-argument constructions in Mandarin. First, we (...)
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  13.  28
    Is Syntax Semantically Constrained? Evidence From a Grammaticality Judgment Study of Indonesian.I. Nyoman Aryawibawa & Ben Ambridge - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):3135-3148.
    A central debate in the cognitive sciences surrounds the nature of adult speakers' linguistic representations: Are they purely syntactic (a traditional and widely held view; e.g., Branigan & Pickering, ), or are they semantically structured? A recent study (Ambridge, Bidgood, Pine, Rowland, & Freudenthal, ) found support for the latter view, showing that adults' acceptability judgments of passive sentences were significantly predicted by independent semantic “affectedness” ratings designed to capture the putative semantics of the construction (e.g., Bob was pushed by (...)
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  14.  18
    Lexical distributional cues, but not situational cues, are readily used to learn abstract locative verb-structure associations.Katherine E. Twomey, Franklin Chang & Ben Ambridge - 2016 - Cognition 153 (C):124-139.
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  15.  33
    Island constraints and overgeneralization in language acquisition.Ben Ambridge - 2015 - Cognitive Linguistics 26 (2):361-370.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 26 Heft: 2 Seiten: 361-370.
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  16.  51
    Children's Acquisition of the English Past‐Tense: Evidence for a Single‐Route Account From Novel Verb Production Data.Ryan P. Blything, Ben Ambridge & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):621-639.
    This study adjudicates between two opposing accounts of morphological productivity, using English past-tense as its test case. The single-route model posits that both regular and irregular past-tense forms are generated by analogy across stored exemplars in associative memory. In contrast, the dual-route model posits that regular inflection requires use of a formal “add -ed” rule that does not require analogy across regular past-tense forms. Children saw animations of an animal performing a novel action described with a novel verb. Past-tense forms (...)
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  17.  31
    Disentangling Effects of Input Frequency and Morphophonological Complexity on Children's Acquisition of Verb Inflection: An Elicited Production Study of Japanese.Tomoko Tatsumi, Ben Ambridge & Julian M. Pine - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):555-577.
    This study aims to disentangle the often-confounded effects of input frequency and morphophonological complexity in the acquisition of inflection, by focusing on simple and complex verb forms in Japanese. Study 1 tested 28 children aged 3;3–4;3 on stative and simple past forms, and Study 2 tested 30 children aged 3;5–5;3 on completive and simple past forms, with both studies using a production priming paradigm. Mixed effects models for children's responses were built to test the prediction that children's verb use is (...)
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  18.  7
    Horses for courses: When acceptability judgments are more suitable than structural priming.Ben Ambridge - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  19.  24
    Predicting children's errors with negative questions: Testing a schema-combination account.Ben Ambridge & Caroline F. Rowland - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (2).
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  20.  20
    The semantics of the transitive causative construction: Evidence from a forced-choice pointing study with adults and children.Ben Ambridge, Claire H. Noble & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2014 - Cognitive Linguistics 25 (2):293-311.
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  21. Philosophical Psychology would like to thank our reviewers for their generous contributions to the journal in 2010. Jonathan Adler Kenneth Aizawa.Kathleen Akins, Pignocchi Alessandro, Joshua Alexander, Anna Alexandrova, Keith Allen, Sophie Allen, Colin Allen, Maria Alvarez, Santiago Amaya & Ben Ambridge - 2010 - Philosophical Psychology 23 (6):845-848.
  22. Analogical structure mapping and the formation of abstract constructions : a novel construction learning study.Ben Ambridge, Micah B. Goldwater & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2018 - In Kristen Surett & Sudha Arunachalam (eds.), Semantics in language acquisition. Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
     
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  23.  19
    Direct Versus Indirect Causation as a Semantic Linguistic Universal: Using a Computational Model of English, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, and K'iche’ Mayan to Predict Grammaticality Judgments in Balinese.I. Nyoman Aryawibawa, Yana Qomariana, Ketut Artawa & Ben Ambridge - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (4):e12974.
    The aim of this study was to test the claim that languages universally employ morphosyntactic marking to differentiate events of more‐ versus less‐direct causation, preferring to mark them with less‐ and more‐ overt marking, respectively (e.g., Somebody broke the window vs. Somebody MADE the window break; *Somebody cried the boy vs. Somebody MADE the boy cry). To this end, we investigated whether a recent computational model which learns to predict speakers’ by‐verb relative preference for the two causatives in English, Hebrew, (...)
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  24.  20
    Syntactic Representations Are Both Abstract and Semantically Constrained: Evidence From Children’s and Adults’ Comprehension and Production/Priming of the English Passive.Amy Bidgood, Julian M. Pine, Caroline F. Rowland & Ben Ambridge - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (9):e12892.
    All accounts of language acquisition agree that, by around age 4, children’s knowledge of grammatical constructions is abstract, rather than tied solely to individual lexical items. The aim of the present research was to investigate, focusing on the passive, whether children’s and adults’ performance is additionally semantically constrained, varying according to the distance between the semantics of the verb and those of the construction. In a forced‐choice pointing study (Experiment 1), both 4‐ to 6‐year olds (N = 60) and adults (...)
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  25.  1
    Learners restrict their linguistic generalizations using preemption but not entrenchment: Evidence from artificial-language-learning studies with adults and children.Anna Samara, Elizabeth Wonnacott, Gaurav Saxena, Ramya Maitreyee, Judit Fazekas & Ben Ambridge - forthcoming - Psychological Review.
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