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Robert Marshall [4]Robert J. Marshall [1]Rob Marshall [1]
  1.  44
    Lost in translation. Homer in English; the patient's story in medicine.Robert J. Marshall & Alan Bleakley - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (1):47-52.
    Next SectionIn a series of previous articles, we have considered how we might reconceptualise central themes in medicine and medical education through ‘thinking with Homer’. This has involved using textual approaches, scenes and characters from the Iliad and Odyssey for rethinking what is a ‘communication skill’, and what do we mean by ‘empathy’ in medical practice; in what sense is medical practice formulaic, like a Homeric ‘song’; and what is lyrical about medical practice. Our approach is not to historicise medicine (...)
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  2.  26
    Toward an Aesthetic Medicine: Developing a Core Medical Humanities Undergraduate Curriculum. [REVIEW]Alan Bleakley, Robert Marshall & Rainer Brömer - 2006 - Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (4):197-213.
    The medical humanities are often implemented in the undergraduate medicine curriculum through injection of discrete option courses as compensation for an overdose of science. The medical humanities may be reformulated as process and perspective, rather than content, where the curriculum is viewed as an aesthetic text and learning as aesthetic and ethical identity formation. This article suggests that a “humanities” perspective may be inherent to the life sciences required for study of medicine. The medical humanities emerge as a revelation of (...)
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  3.  28
    The Medical Humanities Today: Humane Health Care or Tool of Governance? [REVIEW]Alan Petersen, Alan Bleakley, Rainer Brömer & Rob Marshall - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):1-4.
    The medical humanities have been presented as a panacea for medical reductionism; a means for ‘humanizing’ medicine. However, there is a lack of consensus about the appropriate contributing disciplines and how curricula should be taught and assessed. This special issue critically examines the role of the medical humanities in medical education and their potential to serve, inadvertently or otherwise, as a tool of governance. The contributors, who include medical educators and medical practitioners, employ a range of perspectives for analysing the (...)
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  4.  5
    Sing, Muse: songs in Homer and in hospital.Robert Marshall & Alan Bleakley - 2011 - Medical Humanities 37 (1):27-33.
    This paper progresses the original argument of Richard Ratzan that formal presentation of the medical case history follows a Homeric oral-formulaic tradition. The everyday work routines of doctors involve a ritual poetics, where the language of recounting the patient's ‘history’ offers an explicitly aesthetic enactment or performance that can be appreciated and given meaning within the historical tradition of Homeric oral poetry and the modernist aesthetic of Minimalism. This ritual poetics shows a reliance on traditional word usages that crucially act (...)
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  5.  3
    Under the Microscope.Robert Marshall - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):61-66.
    This is a personal account of life in the United Kingdom National Health Service by a pathologist who has worked there for 25 years. The principles of clinical governance are embraced by the medical profession, but their application is often insensitive, governmental and bureaucratic. A doctor’s working life is now less autonomous, less centred on the patient and less fun. Medical humanities are a balm for the sore spots but not, I think, used consciously so by management, likely suffering from (...)
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