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Michael S. Carolan [13]Michael Carolan [7]
  1.  43
    Acting like an algorithm: digital farming platforms and the trajectories they (need not) lock-in.Michael Carolan - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (4):1041-1053.
    This paper contributes to our understanding of farm data value chains with assistance from 54 semi-structured interviews and field notes from participant observations. Methodologically, it includes individuals, such as farmers, who hold well-known positionalities within digital agriculture spaces—platforms that include precision farming techniques, farm equipment built on machine learning architecture and algorithms, and robotics—while also including less visible elements and practices. The actors interviewed and materialities and performances observed thus came from spaces and places inhabited by, for example, farmers, crop (...)
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  2.  23
    Adventurous food futures: knowing about alternatives is not enough, we need to feel them.Michael Carolan - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):141-152.
    This paper investigates how we can enact, collectively, affording food systems. Yet rather than asking simply what those assemblages might look like the author enquires as to how they might also feel. Building on existing literature that speaks to the radically relational, and deeply affective, nature of food the aims of this paper are multiple: to learn more about how moments of difference come about in otherwise seemingly banal encounters; to understand some of the processes by which novelty ripples out, (...)
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  3.  8
    When justifications are mistaken for motivations: COVID-related dietary changes at the food-health decision-making nexus.Michael Carolan - 2023 - Agriculture and Human Values 41 (1):313-330.
    This paper draws from data collected from 500+ surveys, distributed twice from the same respondents (2020 and 2021), and forty-five face-to-face interviews (2022). The location studied is a metropolitan county in Colorado (USA). The research examined the discourses and practices having to do with organic and natural food consumption—note, too, the data were collected at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings upend conventional understandings of, and frameworks used to explain, consumer behavior. What are often presented as motivations in (...)
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  4.  24
    The Mutability of Biotechnology Patents: From Unwieldy Products of Nature to Independent 'Object/s'.Michael S. Carolan - 2010 - Theory, Culture and Society 27 (1):110-129.
    This article details how patent law works to create discrete, immutable biological ‘objects’. This socio-legal maneuver is necessary to distinguish these artifacts from the unwieldy realm of the natural world. The creation of ‘objects’ also serves the interests of capital, where a stable, unchanging, immutable object goes hand in hand with commodification. Yet this stabilization is incomplete. Pointing to a variety of different examples, this article illustrates how biotech patents do not speak to specific, immutable things. Biotech patents, rather, are (...)
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  5.  3
    Democratizing Knowledge: Sustainable and Conventional Agricultural Field Days as Divergent Democratic Forms.Michael S. Carolan - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (4):508-528.
    This article highlights that in our rush to call for the democratization of science and expertise we must not forget to speak to what type of democratization we are calling for. In short, not all participatory forms are the same. In developing this argument, I examine one such form that has yet to receive much attention from science and technology studies scholars: the agricultural field day. In examining the field day, we find that its orientation—that is, toward either the conventional (...)
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  6.  44
    The Multidimensionality of Environmental Problems: The GMO Controversy and the Limits of Scientific Materialism.Michael S. Carolan - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (1):67 - 82.
    This paper argues for a broader understanding of complexity; an understanding that speaks to the multidimensionality of environmental problems. As argued, environmental problems rest upon ontological, epistemological, and moral claims; they rest, in other words, upon statements about what is, knowledge, and what ought to be, respectively. To develop and illustrate this argument, the GMO (genetically modified organism) controversy is broken down according to these three dimensions. Dissecting environmental problems in this manner reveals why we cannot look solely toward the (...)
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  7.  28
    Disciplining Nature: The Homogenising and Constraining Forces of Anti-Markets on the Food System.Michael S. Carolan - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (3):363 - 387.
    To understand the changing patterns within agriculture, it is important to look not only at social relations and organisational configurations. Also salient to such an analysis is an examination of how those formations give shape to non-humans. Much attention has been placed recently on the political economy of agriculture when speaking of these emergent patterns. Yet in doing this, the natural environment is all too often relegated to the backdrop; where the agroeconomy is viewed as something that manoeuvres within the (...)
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  8.  12
    Just-in-case transitions and the pursuit of resilient food systems: enumerative politics and what it means to make care count.Michael Carolan - 2023 - Agriculture and Human Values 40 (3):1055-1066.
    This paper represents one of the first critical social science interrogations of an agrifood just-in-case transition. The just-in-case transition speaks to a philosophy that values building buffers and flexibility into longer value chains to make them more resilient to shocks, which stands in contrast to the just-in-time philosophy with its emphasis on long, specialized, and often inflexible networks. Influenced by COVID-related disruptions and climate change induced uncertainties, the just-in-case transition examined here centers on the heightened interest in vertical farm-anchored supply (...)
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  9.  17
    Putting food access in its topological place: thinking in terms of relational becomings when mapping space.Michael Carolan - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):243-256.
    This paper adopts a relational, also known as a topological, approach to food accessibility—the idea that food spaces are best understood as relational becomings rather than as voids filled exclusively with mass and address. It is animated by an experimental spirit, in terms of the methods employed, the data collected, and by how those data are brought together, which together better enriches inductive theorizing. The project looks at the daily macro-mobilities—trips from one GPS coordinate to another—of 70 Coloradoans, triangulated with (...)
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  10.  26
    Process sub-politics: Placing empirical flesh on Whiteheadian thought.Michael S. Carolan - 2009 - Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (2):187 – 203.
    This paper is more explorative than programmatic. It attempts to place empirical flesh on some of Alfred North Whitehead's speculative thoughts on concrete apprehensions. The challenge lies in the fact that Whitehead was vague on the subject. While Whitehead offers numerous thoughts on why we mistake the abstract for the concrete he wrote considerably less on how we can get ourselves to think more concretely. I therefore examine an empirical case and work 'backwards', showing its affinities with process thought. A (...)
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  11.  8
    The Food Sharing Revolution: How Start-Ups, Pop-Ups, and Co-Ops Are Changing the Way We Eat.Michael S. Carolan - 2018 - Island Press/Center for Resource Economics.
    Marvin is a contract hog farmer in Iowa. He owns his land, his barn, his tractor, and his animal crates. He has seen profits drop steadily for the last twenty years and feels trapped. Josh is a dairy farmer on a cooperative in Massachusetts. He doesn’t own his cows, his land, his seed, or even all of his equipment. Josh has a healthy income and feels like he’s made it. In The Food Sharing Revolution, Michael Carolan tells the stories of (...)
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  12.  43
    Social change and the adoption and adaptation of knowledge claims: Whose truth do you trust in regard to sustainable agriculture? [REVIEW]Michael S. Carolan - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):325-339.
    This paper examines sustainable agriculture’s steady rise as a legitimate farm management system. In doing this, it offers an account of social change that centers on trust and its intersection with networks of knowledge. The argument to follow is informed by the works of Foucault and Latour but moves beyond this literature in important ways. Guided by and building upon earlier conceptual framework first forwarded by Carolan and Bell (2003, Environmental Values 12: 225–245), sustainable agriculture is examined through the lens (...)
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  13.  13
    Who and what gets recognized in digital agriculture: agriculture 4.0 at the intersectionality of (Dis)Ableism, labor, and recognition justice. [REVIEW]Michael Carolan - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-16.
    This paper builds on prior critical scholarship on Agriculture 4.0—an umbrella term to reference the utilization of robotics and automation, AI, remote sensing, big data, and the like in agriculture—especially the literature focusing on issues relating to equity and social sustainability. Critical agrifood scholarship has spent considerable energy interrogating who gets what, how decisions get made, and who counts as a “stakeholder” in the context of decision making, questions relating to distributive justice, procedural justice, and representative justice, respectively. Less attention, (...)
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  14.  23
    Genetically Modified Diplomacy. [REVIEW]Michael S. Carolan - 2009 - Environmental Ethics 31 (2):221-222.
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  15.  39
    Michael Halewood A.N. Whitehead and Social Theory. [REVIEW]Michael Carolan - 2012 - Process Studies 41 (1):176-178.
  16.  28
    Precautionary Politics. [REVIEW]Michael S. Carolan - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (2):213-214.
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