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  1.  21
    Familial Genetic Risks: How Can We Better Navigate Patient Confidentiality and Appropriate Risk Disclosure to Relatives?Edward S. Dove, Vicky Chico, Michael Fay, Graeme Laurie, Anneke M. Lucassen & Emily Postan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):504-507.
    This article investigates a high-profile and ongoing dilemma for healthcare professionals, namely whether the existence of a duty of care to genetic relatives of a patient is a help or a hindrance in deciding what to do in cases where a patient’s genetic information may have relevance to the health of the patient’s family members. The English case ABC v St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust and others considered if a duty of confidentiality owed to the patient and a putative duty (...)
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  2.  24
    Defining Ourselves: Personal Bioinformation as a Tool of Narrative Self-Conception.Emily Postan - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (1):133-151.
    Where ethical or regulatory questions arise about an individual’s interests in accessing bioinformation about herself, the value of this information has traditionally been construed in terms of its clinical utility. It is increasingly argued, however, that the “personal utility” of findings should also be taken into account. This article characterizes one particular aspect of personal utility: that derived from the role of personal bioinformation in identity construction. The suggestion that some kinds of information are relevant to identity is not in (...)
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  3.  12
    Narrative Devices: Neurotechnologies, Information, and Self-Constitution.Emily Postan - 2020 - Neuroethics 14 (2):231-251.
    This article provides a conceptual and normative framework through which we may understand the potentially ethically significant roles that information generated by neurotechnologies about our brains and minds may play in our construction of our identities. Neuroethics debates currently focus disproportionately on the ways that third parties may use these kinds of information. These debates occlude interests we may have in whether and how we ourselves encounter information about our own brains and minds. This gap is not yet adequately addressed (...)
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  4.  4
    Co-production and Managing Uncertainty in Health Research Regulation: A Delphi Study.Isabel Fletcher, Stanislav Birko, Edward S. Dove, Graeme T. Laurie, Catriona McMillan, Emily Postan, Nayha Sethi & Annie Sorbie - 2020 - Health Care Analysis 28 (2):99-120.
    European and international regulation of human health research is typified by a morass of interconnecting laws, diverse and divergent ethical frameworks, and national and transnational standards. There is also a tendency for legislators to regulate in silos—that is, in discrete fields of scientific activity without due regard to the need to make new knowledge as generalisable as possible. There are myriad challenges for the stakeholders—researchers and regulators alike—who attempt to navigate these landscapes. This Delphi study was undertaken in order to (...)
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