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Graeme T. Laurie [17]Graeme Laurie [10]
  1. An Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research.Vicki Xafis, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Iain Brassington, Angela Ballantyne, Hannah Yeefen Lim, Wendy Lipworth, Tamra Lysaght, Cameron Stewart, Shirley Sun, Graeme T. Laurie & E. Shyong Tai - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (3):227-254.
    Ethical decision-making frameworks assist in identifying the issues at stake in a particular setting and thinking through, in a methodical manner, the ethical issues that require consideration as well as the values that need to be considered and promoted. Decisions made about the use, sharing, and re-use of big data are complex and laden with values. This paper sets out an Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research developed by a working group convened by the Science, Health and (...)
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  2.  16
    The Social Licence for Research: Whycare.Dataran Into Trouble.Pam Carter, Graeme T. Laurie & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):404-409.
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  3.  66
    Genetic Privacy: A Challenge to Medico-Legal Norms.Graeme Laurie - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    The phenomenon of the New Genetics raises complex social problems, particularly those of privacy. This book offers ethical and legal perspectives on the questions of a right to know and not to know genetic information from the standpoint of individuals, their relatives, employers, insurers and the state. Graeme Laurie provides a unique definition of privacy, including a concept of property rights in the person, and argues for stronger legal protection of privacy in the shadow of developments in human genetics. He (...)
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  4.  21
    Familial Genetic Risks: How Can We Better Navigate Patient Confidentiality and Appropriate Risk Disclosure to Relatives?Edward S. Dove, Vicky Chico, Michael Fay, Graeme Laurie, Anneke M. Lucassen & Emily Postan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):504-507.
    This article investigates a high-profile and ongoing dilemma for healthcare professionals, namely whether the existence of a duty of care to genetic relatives of a patient is a help or a hindrance in deciding what to do in cases where a patient’s genetic information may have relevance to the health of the patient’s family members. The English case ABC v St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust and others considered if a duty of confidentiality owed to the patient and a putative duty (...)
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  5.  33
    Recognizing the Right Not to Know: Conceptual, Professional, and Legal Implications.Graeme Laurie - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (1):53-63.
    This article argues for the importance of conceptual clarity in the debate about the so-called right not to know. This is vital both at the theoretical and the practical level. It is suggested that, unlike many formulations and attempts to give effect to this right, what is at stake is not merely an aspect of personal autonomy and therefore cannot and should not be reduced only to a question of individual choice. Rather, it is argued that the core interests that (...)
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  6.  25
    Recognizing the Right Not to Know: Conceptual, Professional, and Legal Implications.Graeme Laurie - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (1):53-63.
    The right not to know is a contested matter. This can be because the inversion of the normal framing of entitlement to information about one's own health is thought to be illogical and inconsistent with self-authorship and/or because the very idea of claiming a right not to know information is an inappropriate appeal to the discourse of rights that places impossible responsibilities on others. Notwithstanding, there has been a sustained increase in this kind of appeal in recent years fueled in (...)
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  7.  68
    Clarifying How to Deploy the Public Interest Criterion in Consent Waivers for Health Data and Tissue Research.G. Owen Schaefer, Graeme Laurie, Sumytra Menon, Alastair V. Campbell & Teck Chuan Voo - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-10.
    Background Several jurisdictions, including Singapore, Australia, New Zealand and most recently Ireland, have a public interest or public good criterion for granting waivers of consent in biomedical research using secondary health data or tissue. However, the concept of the public interest is not well defined in this context, which creates difficulties for institutions, institutional review boards and regulators trying to implement the criterion. Main text This paper clarifies how the public interest criterion can be defensibly deployed. We first explain the (...)
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  8.  7
    Charting Regulatory Stewardship in Health Research: Making the Invisible Visible.Graeme T. Laurie, Edward S. Dove, Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra, Isabel Fletcher, Catriona Mcmillan, Nayha Sethi & Annie Sorbie - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (2):333-347.
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  9.  11
    Cross-Sectoral Big Data: The Application of an Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research.Graeme T. Laurie - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (3):327-339.
    Discussion of uses of biomedical data often proceeds on the assumption that the data are generated and shared solely or largely within the health sector. However, this assumption must be challenged because increasingly large amounts of health and well-being data are being gathered and deployed in cross-sectoral contexts such as social media and through the internet of things and wearable devices. Cross-sectoral sharing of data thus refers to the generation, use and linkage of biomedical data beyond the health sector. This (...)
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  10.  17
    Reconfiguring Social Value in Health Research Through the Lens of Liminality.Agomoni Ganguli‐Mitra, Edward S. Dove, Graeme T. Laurie & Samuel Taylor‐Alexander - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (2):87-96.
    Despite the growing importance of ‘social value’ as a central feature of research ethics, the term remains both conceptually vague and to a certain extent operationally rigid. And yet, perhaps because the rhetorical appeal of social value appears immediate and self-evident, the concept has not been put to rigorous investigation in terms of its definition, strength, function, and scope. In this article, we discuss how the anthropological concept of liminality can illuminate social value and differentiate and reconfigure its variegated approaches. (...)
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  11.  39
    Respecting Autonomy Over Time: Policy and Empirical Evidence on Re‐Consent in Longitudinal Biomedical Research.Susan E. Wallace, Elli G. Gourna, Graeme Laurie, Osama Shoush & Jessica Wright - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (3):210-217.
    Re-consent in research, the asking for a new consent if there is a change in protocol or to confirm the expectations of participants in case of change, is an under-explored issue. There is little clarity as to what changes should trigger re-consent and what impact a re-consent exercise has on participants and the research project. This article examines applicable policy statements and literature for the prevailing arguments for and against re-consent in relation to longitudinal cohort studies, tissue banks and biobanks. (...)
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  12.  16
    Fail to Prepare and You Prepare to Fail: The Human Rights Consequences of the UK Government’s Inaction During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Rhiannon Frowde, Edward S. Dove & Graeme T. Laurie - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (4):459-480.
    As the sustained and devastating extent of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic becomes apparent, a key focus of public scrutiny in the UK has centred on the novel legal and regulatory measures introduced in response to the virus. When those measures were first implemented in March 2020 by the UK Government, it was thought that human rights obligations would limit excesses of governmental action and that the public had more to fear from unwarranted intrusion into civil liberties. However, within the (...)
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  13.  4
    Co-production and Managing Uncertainty in Health Research Regulation: A Delphi Study.Isabel Fletcher, Stanislav Birko, Edward S. Dove, Graeme T. Laurie, Catriona McMillan, Emily Postan, Nayha Sethi & Annie Sorbie - 2020 - Health Care Analysis 28 (2):99-120.
    European and international regulation of human health research is typified by a morass of interconnecting laws, diverse and divergent ethical frameworks, and national and transnational standards. There is also a tendency for legislators to regulate in silos—that is, in discrete fields of scientific activity without due regard to the need to make new knowledge as generalisable as possible. There are myriad challenges for the stakeholders—researchers and regulators alike—who attempt to navigate these landscapes. This Delphi study was undertaken in order to (...)
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  14.  7
    Delivering a Practical Framework for Ethical Decision-Making Involving Big Data in Health and Research.Graeme T. Laurie & E. Shyong Tai - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (3):223-225.
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  15.  15
    A Qualitative Study of Participants’ Views on Re-Consent in a Longitudinal Biobank.Mary Dixon-Woods, David Kocman, Liz Brewster, Janet Willars, Graeme Laurie & Carolyn Tarrant - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):22.
    Biomedical research increasingly relies on long-term studies involving use and re-use of biological samples and data stored in large repositories or “biobanks” over lengthy periods, often raising questions about whether and when a re-consenting process should be activated. We sought to investigate the views on re-consent of participants in a longitudinal biobank. We conducted a qualitative study involving interviews with 24 people who were participating in a longitudinal biobank. Their views were elicited using a semi-structured interview schedule and scenarios based (...)
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  16. Theory and Practice in Bioethics.Graeme T. Laurie - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (1):1-3.
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  17. Values, Principles, Perspectives and Attitudes in Bioethics.Graeme T. Laurie - 2022 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (3):213-215.
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  18.  18
    What Does It Mean to Take an Ethics+ Approach to Global Biobank Governance?Graeme Laurie - 2017 - Asian Bioethics Review 9 (4):285-300.
    This article re-examines and fundamentally re-assesses the symbiotic relationship between law and ethics in the governance and regulation of biobanks as a global phenomenon. Set against the two decades of experience of set-up, management and most recently granting access to biobanks to promote advances in human health, it is argued that the boundaries—and so the legitimacy—of the respective roles of ethics and law have become blurred and, potentially, blunted. The caricature of law as a tool of command and control—resulting in (...)
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  19.  7
    Bidding Farewell to 2020: What Lessons Have We Learned and What Can Bioethics Continue to Teach Us?Graeme T. Laurie - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (4):375-378.
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  20.  5
    Meeting the Publishing Needs of the Bioethics Community.Graeme T. Laurie - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (3):279-282.
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  21.  32
    Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universals in Medicine (Review).Graeme T. Laurie & Michael A. Grodin - 2000 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (4):627-629.
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  22.  5
    Conception, COVID, and Communication.Graeme T. Laurie - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):129-132.
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  23.  4
    Enacting Bioethics.Graeme T. Laurie - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (3):253-255.
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  24.  4
    Sustaining Bioethical Contributions in Times of Crisis and Change.Graeme Laurie - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (2):61-63.
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  25.  3
    Asian Bioethics Review Enters a New Era.Graeme Laurie - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (1):1-3.
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  26.  1
    Diversity of Experience and Perspective in Bioethics.Graeme T. Laurie - 2022 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (2):103-105.
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  27.  1
    Widening the Reach of Bioethics Scholarship.Graeme T. Laurie - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (4):371-374.
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