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Dennis L. Sepper [27]Dennis Lee Sepper [1]
  1.  18
    Descartes’s Imagination: Proportion, Images, and the Activity of Thinking.Dennis L. Sepper - 1996 - Univ of California Press.
    "A work of major importance for the interpretation of Descartes's development and for the understanding of the function of the imagination in Descartes's early works. Descartes's Imagination will be a must in Descartes and imagination studies. It is long overdue."--Eva T. H. Brann, author of The World of Imagination: Sum and Substance "A significant contribution to our understanding of the development of Descartes's philosophy."--William R. Shea, author of The Magic of Numbers and Motion: The Scientific Career of Rene Descartes.
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  2. Goethe Contra Newton: Polemics and the Project for a New Science of Color.Dennis L. Sepper - 1988 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book explains the background and rationale of the German poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's notorious attack on Isaac Newton's classic theory of white light and colors. Though the merits of Goethe's color science, as advanced in his massive Zur Farbenlehre, have often been acknowledged, it has been almost unanimously proclaimed invalid as physics. How could Goethe have been so mistaken? In his book, Dennis Sepper shows that the condemnation of Goethe's attacks on Newton has been based on erroneous assumptions (...)
     
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  3.  4
    Understanding Imagination: The Reason of Images.Dennis L. Sepper - 2013 - Dordrecht: Imprint: Springer.
    This book discusses that imagination is as important to thinking and reasoning as it is to making and acting. By reexamining our philosophical and psychological heritage, it traces a framework, a conceptual topology, that underlies the most disparate theories: a framework that presents imagination as founded in the placement of appearances. It shows how this framework was progressively developed by thinkers like Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, and Kant, and how it is reflected in more recent developments in theorists as different as (...)
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  4.  55
    Descartes and the eclipse of imagination, 1618-1630.Dennis L. Sepper - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (3):379-403.
  5. The texture of thought: Why Descartes'“Meditationes” is meditational, and why it matters.Dennis L. Sepper - 2000 - In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 736--750.
     
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  6.  68
    Imagination, Phantasms, And The Making Of Hobbesian And Cartesian Science.Dennis L. Sepper - 1988 - The Monist 71 (4):526-542.
    In January 1641 Marin Mersenne forwarded to René Descartes a set of objections to the latter’s Meditations that Mersenne had solicited from “an Englishman.” This, along with some optical papers that Descartes may not have known were from the same person, was apparently his first philosophical encounter with Thomas Hobbes. The surviving correspondence and the Meditations’s third set of “Objections and Replies” show that the antipathy between these two otherwise excellent minds was virtually instantaneous. The irony has often been remarked (...)
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  7. Figuring things out: Figurate problem-solving in the early Descartes.Dennis L. Sepper - 2000 - In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 228--248.
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  8.  23
    After fascism, after the war: Thresholds of thinking in contemporary italian philosophy.Dennis L. Sepper - 2006 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):603-619.
    This article offers a detailed review of Filosofi italiani contemporanei, a book that presents overviews of seven contemporary Italian philosophers and philosopher/theologians—Luigi Pareyson, Emanuele Severino, Italo Mancini, Gianni Vattimo, Vincenzo Vitiello, Massimo Cacciari, and theologian Bruno Forte. Not intended as a comprehensive survey of the contemporary Italian philosophical scene, the book presents thinkers influential during the last three decades who have focused on tradition, post-metaphysical conceptions of being, origin, and principle, and the openness of philosophy to religion. Although eccentric by (...)
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  9.  29
    After Fascism, After the War.Dennis L. Sepper - 2006 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):603-619.
    This article offers a detailed review of Filosofi italiani contemporanei, a book that presents overviews of seven contemporary Italian philosophers and philosopher/theologians—Luigi Pareyson, Emanuele Severino, Italo Mancini, Gianni Vattimo, Vincenzo Vitiello, Massimo Cacciari, and theologian Bruno Forte. Not intended as a comprehensive survey of the contemporary Italian philosophical scene, the book presents thinkers influential during the last three decades who have focused on tradition, post-metaphysical conceptions of being, origin, and principle, and the openness of philosophy to religion. Although eccentric by (...)
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  10.  4
    Cartesian Imaginations: The Method and Passions of Imagining.Dennis L. Sepper - 2005 - In Alan Nelson (ed.), A Companion to Rationalism. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 156–176.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The Status of the Rationalist Image The Deeper Background Descartes: The Directed Imagination of Mathematics, and Passions as Nascent Images Malebranche Conclusion.
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  11.  11
    Cognitive Pluralism as Obligation?Dennis Lee Sepper - 2013 - In Stefano Bacin, Alfredo Ferrarin, Claudio La Rocca & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Kant und die Philosophie in weltbürgerlicher Absicht. Akten des XI. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Boston: de Gruyter. pp. 497-506.
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  12.  73
    Goethe and the Poetics of Science.Dennis L. Sepper - 2005 - Janus Head 8 (1):207-227.
    In Representative Men, Ralph Waldo Emerson presented Goethe as the prototype of the writer elected by nature, and he identified Goethe's specific genius as "putting ever a thing for a word." But Goethe's talents as writer and poet have long seemed to scientific readers to undermine his efforts to be a scientist, and to talk of his, or any, poetics of science would involve a category mistake. But putting things to words—that is, filling and structuring what we say about the (...)
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  13.  28
    Goethe, Newton, and the Imagination of Modern Science.Dennis L. Sepper - 2009 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 249 (3):261-277.
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  14.  9
    Imagination and Postmodernity. By Patrick L. Bourgeois.Dennis L. Sepper - 2015 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (2):333-336.
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  15.  7
    Le forme e il vivente: Morfologia e filosofia della natura in J. W. GoethePaola Giacomoni.Dennis L. Sepper - 1994 - Isis 85 (4):700-701.
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  16.  24
    Newton's Opticks as Classic: On Teaching the Texture of Science.Dennis L. Sepper - 1994 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:258 - 265.
    Using the example of Newton's Opticks, the author develops the concept of 'classic' as applied to landmark works in the history of the sciences. A discussion of themes drawn from H.-G. Gadamer and T. Kuhn is followed by an introduction of the notions of the texture and contexture of scientific works, conceived as the result of an author's weaving together foreground and background concerns. These notions assist in understanding how certain works can exercise a continuing appeal to both specialists and (...)
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  17. Peter A. Schouls, Descartes and the Possibility of Science Reviewed by.Dennis L. Sepper - 2002 - Philosophy in Review 22 (2):143-145.
     
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  18.  4
    Spinoza, Leibniz, and the Rationalist Reconceptions of Imagination.Dennis L. Sepper - 2005 - In Alan Nelson (ed.), A Companion to Rationalism. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 322–342.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Spinoza and the Passionate Imagination Leibniz and the Logic of Imagination Wolff and the Scholasticism of Imagination Conclusion.
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  19.  27
    Being-in-the-World. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 1991 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 65 (4):505-507.
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  20.  13
    Being-in-the-World. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 1991 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 65 (4):505-507.
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  21.  31
    Color for Philosophers. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):834-837.
    The natural sciences, born of philosophy, have always influenced philosophical debate. It is not surprising, then, that the books under review take at least part of their impulse from twentieth-century scientific work on color.
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  22.  39
    Descartes and the Resilience of Rhetoric. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 1993 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 67 (2):257-258.
  23.  77
    Heidegger, Authenticity and Modernity. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):521-525.
  24.  7
    Heidegger, Authenticity and Modernity. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):521-525.
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  25.  21
    Michelle Karnes, Imagination, Meditation, and Cognition in the Middle Ages. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. Pp. xiv, 268. $45. ISBN: 9780226425313. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 2013 - Speculum 88 (4):1116-1118.
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  26.  26
    Robert Grosseteste, The Dimensions of Colour: Robert Grosseteste's “De colore”., ed. and trans., Greti Dinkova-Bruun, Giles E. M. Gasper, Michael Huxtable, Tom C. B. McLeish, Cecilia Panti, and Hannah Smithson. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2013. Paper. Pp. x, 94; color figures. $19.95. ISBN: 978-0-88844-564-3. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 2015 - Speculum 90 (3):816-817.
  27.  18
    Science as a Process. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (1):169-170.
    For more than two decades the philosopher of science David Hull has been involved with the community of biologists engaged in questions of taxonomical classification and evolution. In this book Hull uses this perspective to good advantage. By narrating the disputes, enmities, and alliances he has witnessed, he develops a theory of scientific change as a process operating according to a kind of natural selection of concepts.
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  28.  24
    The Ethics of Geometry. [REVIEW]Dennis L. Sepper - 1990 - Review of Metaphysics 44 (1):149-151.
    The foci of this penetrating study are Euclid's geometry and Descartes' mathematics. It is a contribution to the history of mathematics, but it is much more, for the differing approaches to mathematics in the ancient and the modern worlds is shown to have deep consequences for both doing and knowing. The investigation is centered on the nature of geometrical construction in ancient and modern mathematics, and, by extension, the crucial importance of construction to the reality and self-understanding of modernity.
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