How Ought Decisions That Weigh on Life and Death Be Justly Informed and Governed to Benefit More than the Privileged Few with Access to a Trusted Clinician?

American Journal of Bioethics 22 (2):1-3 (2022)

Abstract

The two target articles in this issue bring into focus the struggle for governance over biomedical interventions that may offer some families more agency—the capacity to act—in the context of many...

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