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Lisa Dive
University of Technology Sydney
  1.  33
    Reconceptualizing Autonomy for Bioethics.Lisa Dive & Ainsley J. Newson - 2018 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (2):171-203.
    The concept of autonomy plays a central role in bioethics,1 but there is no consensus as to how we should understand it beyond a general notion of self-determination. The conception of autonomy deployed in applied ethics2 can have crucial ramifications when it is applied in real-world scenarios, so it is important to be clear. However, this clarity is often lacking when autonomy is discussed in the bioethics literature. In this paper we outline three different conceptions of autonomy, and argue that (...)
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  2.  12
    Public Trust and Global Biobank Networks.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Cameron Stewart, Edwina Light, Miriam Wiersma, Paul Mason, Margaret Otlowski, Christine Critchley & Lisa Dive - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundBiobanks provide an important foundation for genomic and personalised medicine. In order to enhance their scientific power and scope, they are increasingly becoming part of national or international networks. Public trust is essential in fostering public engagement, encouraging donation to, and facilitating public funding for biobanks. Globalisation and networking of biobanking may challenge this trust.MethodsWe report the results of an Australian study examining public attitudes to the networking and globalisation of biobanks. The study used quantitative and qualitative methods in conjunction (...)
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  3.  11
    Obligations and Preferences in Knowing and Not Knowing: The Importance of Context.Lisa Dive & Ainsley Janelle Newson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):306-307.
    In healthcare broadly, and especially in genetic medicine, there is an ongoing debate about whether patients have a right not to know information about their own health. The extensive literature on this topic is characterised by a range of different understandings of what it means to have a RNTK,1–9 and how this purported right relates to patient autonomy. Ben Davies considers whether obligations not to place avoidable burdens on a publicly funded healthcare system might form the basis for an obligation (...)
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  4.  8
    Autonomy, Information, and Paternalism in Clinical Communication.Lisa Dive - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (11):50-52.
    While this paper does not explicitly define the concept of autonomy, the way Ubel et al describe clinicians’ failures to enhance their patients’ autonomy reflects a broader understanding of autonomy than the default account as free and informed choice. In this OPC I would demonstrate that the communication strategies the authors recommend reflects a more sophisticated conception of autonomy than the understanding that typically prevails in bioethics. I will also distinguish between weak and strong forms of paternalism, and argue that (...)
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  5. Intertwined Interests in Expanded Prenatal Genetic Testing: The State’s Role in Facilitating Equitable Access.Kathryn MacKay, Zuzana Deans, Isabella Holmes, Ainsley J. Newson & Lisa Dive - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (2):45-47.
    In their analysis of how much fetal genetic information prospective parents should be able to access, Bayefsky and Berkman determine that parents should only be able to access information th...
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  6.  13
    Globalisation and the Ethics of Transnational Biobank Networks.Lisa Dive, Paul Mason, Edwina Light, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Asian Bioethics Review 9 (4):301-310.
    Biobanks are increasingly being linked together into global networks in order to maximise their capacity to identify causes of and treatments for disease. While there is great optimism about the potential of these biobank networks to contribute to personalised and data-driven medicine, there are also ethical concerns about, among other things, risks to personal privacy and exploitation of vulnerable populations. Concepts drawn from theories of globalisation can assist with the characterisation of the ethical implications of biobank networking across borders, which (...)
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  7.  6
    Reproductive Carrier Screening: Responding to the Eugenics Critique.Lisa Dive & Ainsley J. Newson - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107343.
    Reproductive genetic carrier screening, when offered to anyone regardless of their family history or ancestry, has been subject to the critique that it is a form of eugenics. Eugenics describes a range of practices that seek to use the science of heredity to improve the genetic composition of a population group. The term is associated with a range of unethical programmes that were taken up in various countries during the 20th century. Contemporary practice in medical genetics has, understandably, distanced itself (...)
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  8.  6
    Ethics of Reproductive Genetic Carrier Screening: From the Clinic to the Population.Lisa Dive & Ainsley J. Newson - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics:phab017.
    Reproductive genetic carrier screening is increasingly being offered more widely, including to people with no family history or otherwise elevated chance of having a baby with a genetic condition. There are valid reasons to reject a prevention-focused public health ethics approach to such screening programs. Rejecting the prevention paradigm in this context has led to an emphasis on more individually-focused values of freedom of choice and fostering reproductive autonomy in RCS. We argue, however, that population-wide RCS has sufficient features in (...)
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  9.  19
    Disruption, Diversity, and Global Biobanking.Edwina Light, Miriam Wiersma, Lisa Dive, Ian Kerridge, Christine Critchley & Wendy Lipworth - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):45-47.
    Volume 19, Issue 5, May 2019, Page 45-47.
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  10.  3
    From a Right to a Preference: Rethinking the Right to Genomic Ignorance.Lisa Dive - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (5):605-629.
    The “right not to know” has generated significant discussion, especially regarding genetic information. In this paper, I argue that this purported right is better understood as a preference and that treating it as a substantive right has led to confusion. To support this claim, I present three critiques of the way the right not to know has been characterized. First, I demonstrate that the many conceptualizations of this right have hampered debate. Second, I show that the way autonomy is conceptualized (...)
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