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  1. The Economic Value of a Sustainable Supply Chain.Robert N. Mefford - 2011 - Business and Society Review 116 (1):109-143.
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  • An Organizational Field Approach to Corporate Rationality: The Role of Stakeholder Activism.Lenahan L. O’Connell, Carroll U. Stephens, Michael Betz, Jon M. Shepard & Jamie R. Hendry - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (1):93-111.
    This paper contends that rationality is more properly evaluated as a property of an organization’s relationships with its stakeholders than of the organization itself. We predicate our approach on the observation that stakeholders can hold goals quite distinct from those of owners and top managers, and these too can be rationally pursued. We build upon stakeholder theory and Weber’s classic distinction between wertrationalitat and zweckrationalitat, adding to them the “new institutionalist” concept of the organization field . Stakeholders employ a variety (...)
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  • The Impact of Cause Portfolio Focus and Contribution Amount on Stakeholder Evaluations.Stefanie Robinson & Meike Eilert - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1483-1514.
    When companies engage in corporate philanthropy, they can donate to a number of causes supporting a variety of issues, thus establishing cause portfolios. This research examines how the focus of a cause portfolio affects company evaluations. Results from an experiment show that when a company donates a small amount of money, consumers have lower evaluations of a company when the cause portfolio is focused versus diverse. This is because the focused portfolio is perceived to have a weaker impact to society. (...)
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  • Scale and Study of Student Attitudes Toward Business Education’s Role in Addressing Social Issues.Bradley J. Sleeper, Kenneth C. Schneider, Paula S. Weber & James E. Weber - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (4):381 - 391.
    Corporations and investors are responding to recent major ethical scandals with increased attention to the social impacts of business operations. In turn, business colleges and their international accrediting body are increasing their efforts to make students more aware of the social context of corporate activity. Business education literature lacks data on student attitudes toward such education. This study found that postscandal business students, particularly women, are indeed interested in it. Their interest is positively related to their past donation, volunteerism, and (...)
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  • An Investigation of Real Versus Perceived CSP in S&P-500 Firms.Catherine Liston-Heyes & Gwen Ceton - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):283-296.
    Firms are spending billions annually in the name of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Whilst markets are increasingly willing to reward good and responsible firms, they lack the instruments to measure corporate social performance (CSP). To convince investors and other stakeholders, firms invest heavily in building a reputation for good corporate behaviour. This article argues that reputations for CSP are often unrepresentative of true CSP and investigates how differences in 'perceived' and 'actual' – as measured by the Fortune and KLD databases, (...)
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  • Scale and Study of Student Attitudes Toward Business Education’s Role in Addressing Social Issues.Bradley J. Sleeper, Kenneth C. Schneider, Paula S. Weber & James E. Weber - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (4):381-391.
    Corporations and investors are responding to recent major ethical scandals with increased attention to the social impacts of business operations. In turn, business colleges and their international accrediting body are increasing their efforts to make students more aware of the social context of corporate activity. Business education literature lacks data on student attitudes toward such education. This study found that postscandal business students, particularly women, are indeed interested in it. Their interest is positively related to their past donation, volunteerism, and (...)
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