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  1. Euthanasia and the Defence of Necessity: Advocating a More Appropriate Legal Response.Suzanne Ost - 2007 - In Charles A. Erin & Suzanne Ost (eds.), The Criminal Justice System and Health Care. Oxford University Press.
     
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  2. Physician-assisted dying outlaws: self-appointed death in the Netherlands.Suzanne Ost - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (1):20-26.
    No law in any jurisdiction that permits physician assisted dying offers individuals a medically assisted death without the need to comply with certain criteria. The Netherlands is no exception. There is evidence to suggest that physicians are averse to providing an assisted death even when the Dutch ‘due care criteria’ have been met and the unbearable pain and suffering requirement is especially difficult to satisfy. Some individuals with an enduring desire to die who do not meet the ‘due care’ criteria (...)
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  3.  29
    Bioethics, medicine, and the criminal law.Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett & Suzanne Ost (eds.) - 2012 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Who should define what constitutes ethical and lawful medical practice? Judges? Doctors? Scientists? Or someone else entirely? This volume analyses how effectively criminal law operates as a forum for resolving ethical conflict in the delivery of health care. It addresses key questions such as: how does criminal law regulate controversial bioethical areas? What effect, positive or negative, does the use of criminal law have when regulating bioethical conflict? And can the law accommodate moral controversy? By exploring criminal law in theory (...)
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    Bioethics, medicine, and the criminal law.Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett & Suzanne Ost (eds.) - 2012 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Who should define what constitutes ethical and lawful medical practice? Judges? Doctors? Scientists? Or someone else entirely? This volume analyses how effectively criminal law operates as a forum for resolving ethical conflict in the delivery of health care. It addresses key questions such as: how does criminal law regulate controversial bioethical areas? What effect, positive or negative, does the use of criminal law have when regulating bioethical conflict? And can the law accommodate moral controversy? By exploring criminal law in theory (...)
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  5. I love you!) I do, I do, I do, I do, I do : breaches of sexual boundaries by patients in their relationships with healthcare professionals.Hazel Biggs & Suzanne Ost - 2015 - In Catherine Stanton, Sarah Devaney, Anne-Maree Farrell & Alexandra Mullock (eds.), Pioneering Healthcare Law: Essays in Honour of Margaret Brazier. Routledge.
     
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  6.  30
    The Criminal Justice System and Health Care.Charles A. Erin & Suzanne Ost (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection examines questions of medical accountability and ethics. It analyses how the criminal justice system regulates health care practice, and to what extent it is appropriate to use it as a tool to resolve ethical conflict in health care.
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    Drs Bramhall and Bawa-Garba and the rightful domain of the criminal law.Suzanne Ost - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (3):151-155.
    In the wake of two recent high-profile, controversial cases involving the prosecution and conviction of Drs Bramhall and Bawa-Garba, this article considers when it is socially desirable to criminalise doctors’ behaviour, exploring how the matters of harm, public wrongs and the public interest can play out to justify—or not, as the case may be—the criminal law’s intervention. Dr Bramhall branded his initials on patients’ livers during transplant surgery, behaviour acknowledged not to have caused his patients any harm by way of (...)
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    A plea for precaution with public health: the xenotransplantation example.Sara Fovargue & Suzanne Ost - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (3):119-124.
    In this paper we argue that while individual private interests such as autonomy and the need for a medical procedure or treatment are important in the provision and delivery of health care and the utilization of biotechnologies, these concepts need to be balanced with other interests such that in certain situations they do not take priority. We use as an example a particular developing biotechnology, xenotransplantation, to suggest that interest in the health of the public is such that this biotechnology (...)
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