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  1.  22
    Comparative Ethics in Hindu and Buddhist Traditions.Roderick Hindery - 1978 - Motilal Banarsidass.
    The book contains elaborate notes, two appendices, critical textual matter, a diagram of topical parallels, a bibliography, and an index.
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  2. Michael Pye, Comparative Religion: An Introduction Through Source Materials, Harper and Row, New York, 1972; 248 Pp. Incl. Bibliography and Index. [REVIEW]Roderick Hindery - 1974 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 2 (1):95-97.
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  3.  22
    Comparative Ethics, Ideologies, and Critical Thought.Roderick Hindery - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2):215-231.
    After the publication of my book and various articles about comparative religious ethics, obstacles in the field's further development seemed to mount as swiftly as practical issues seemed to trumpet the need for global ethics more loudly. Driven by impatience, I wondered if I were fiddling in unending discussion while the planet burned. As others persevered and evolved productively in addressing developmental issues in the field directly, I began to work through the lens of a less direct, but complementary, perspective: (...)
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  4.  23
    Hindu Ethics in the Rāmāyana.Roderick Hindery - 1976 - Journal of Religious Ethics 4 (2):287 - 322.
    This descriptive exposition of Hindu ethics in the "Rāmāyaṇa", India's most celebrated people's classic, analyzes the Vālmīki version in terms of four ethical questions about mores, ethos, societal structures, and forms of ethical validation. The epic's life-affirming ethos, together with its moral education and esthetical persuasion through model characters, is viewed as a pluralistic alternative to forms of Hindu ethics more known in the West. The latter are those implied in Hindu non-dualistic philosophies, mysticism, and an ascetical ethos of world-denial. (...)
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