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  1.  32
    ‘A Steady Contempt of Life’: Suicide Narratives in Hume and Others.Max Grober - 2012 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (1):51-68.
    In a letter of 1746, David Hume tells of the suicide of his kinsman Major Forbes. While Hume's account overtly presents the major's suicide as heroic, incorporating allusions to the Ajax of Sophocles and the lives of noble Romans such as Cato, the narrative context in which he places it, and the nature of narrative itself, call the wisdom of the act into question. In his essay ‘Of Suicide’, written a few years later, Hume largely avoids narrative examples. However, the (...)
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    Hume and the Royal African.Max Grober - 2022 - Hume Studies 47 (2):285-309.
    Abstract:A previously overlooked letter written by David Hume to the Comtesse de Boufflers in 1766, read alongside an unpublished letter to Hume from the British official John Roberts, sheds important new light on Hume’s views on race. The letters concern a famous episode in eighteenth-century history, the enslavement and redemption of the “African Prince,” William Ansah Sessarakoo, and his subsequent time as a celebrity in London in 1749–50. Hume’s account of these events, based on Roberts’s letter but re-shaped through a (...)
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  3.  37
    Essays on David Hume, Medical Men and the Scottish Enlightenment: ‘Industry, Knowledge and Humanity.’ by Roger L. Emerson (review). [REVIEW]Max Grober - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (2):243-247.
    This volume collects ten essays by the distinguished historian Roger L. Emerson. Many are augmented versions of public lectures or conference papers, and all advance Emerson’s career-long study of the Scottish Enlightenment, its social foundations, and its institutional embodiments. Emerson states his case and names his rivals in the anchor piece of the collection, “What is to be Done About the Scottish Enlightenment?” The Scottish Enlightenment, he argues, was a broad-based, indigenous movement of long standing, largely independent of English models. (...)
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