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  1. Living in Nowheresville: David Hume’s Equal Power Requirement, Political Entitlements and People with Intellectual Disabilities.James B. Gould - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Disability 1:145-173.
    Political theory contains two views of social care for people with intellectual disabilities. The favor view treats disability services as an undeserved gratuity, while the entitlement view sees them as a deserved right. This paper argues that David Hume is one philosophical source of the favor view; he bases political membership on a threshold level of mental capacity and shuts out anyone who falls below. Hume’s account, which excludes people with intellectual disabilities from justice owing to their lack of power, (...)
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  2. When the Manner of Death Disagrees with the Status of Life. The Intricate Question of Suicide in Early Modern Philosophy.Sarah Tropper - 2021 - In Susan James (ed.), Life and Death in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford, Vereinigtes Königreich: pp. 211-226.
    This chapter discusses the development of philosophical discussions of suicide between the Middle Ages and David Hume’s ‘On Suicide’. In tracing the development of several arguments for and against suicide, it shows that the medieval phase of blanket prohibition met some resistance in Renaissance fictional accounts or renditions of Roman sources, but that early modern philosophers neither absorbed nor countered those arguments. Rather, they returned to a prohibitionist stance with arguments based on assertions about natural rights and duties or the (...)
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  3. Hume and Animal Ethics.Deborah Boyle - 2019 - In Angela Michelle Coventry & Alex Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge.
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  4. Hume's Legacy Concerning Race.Andre C. Willis - 2019 - In Angela Michelle Coventry & Alex Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge.
  5. Importance of the historical context in philosophy: the case of the moral philosophy of David Hume.Alejandro Ordieres - 2018 - Alpha (Osorno) 46:233-247.
    Resumen El presente artículo plantea la necesidad de un acercamiento histórico a los textos filosóficos tomando como ejemplo el caso de la propuesta ética de David Hume. Se muestra el interés de Hume por insertarse en el diálogo intelectual de su época y su propósito de integrar el método científico en las ciencias morales y cómo la crítica que hace a la razón debe ser comprendida bajo esta luz. Para ello se menciona el ambiente intelectual de la época y las (...)
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  6. El Papel de la Educación En la Filosofía Moral de David Hume.Santiago Álvarez García - 2017 - Educacao Em Foco 30:17-37.
    El presente artículo muestra cómo la crítica humeana a los fundamentos del racionalismo moral y a sus consecuencias en el terreno de las ideas educativas propició un cambio significativo en la comprensión de los objetivos de la educación moral que pasaron de buscar el perfeccionamiento de la agencia, a perseguir la perfección y el refinamiento de las capacidades del individuo como espectador y evaluador moral imparcial. Esta trasformación de la finalidad y del currículo de la educación moral será la solución (...)
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  7. A Propósito de "Of Suicide".Aida Míguez Barciela - 2017 - In La historia y la nada. Madrid: La Oficina.
  8. Do the Works of the Nationalist–Ideological Philosophers Undermine Hume’s and Kant’s Ideas About Race?Ovett Nwosimiri - 2017 - SAGE Open 2017:1-11.
    As a response to the question posed in the title, this article presents a critical assessment of how the works of the nationalist–ideological philosophers can be seen as evidence against David Hume’s and Immanuel Kant’s ideas of race. Hume and Kant have certain ideas about race; if these ideas are true, then there is—and indeed, can be—no African philosophy. But there is African philosophy—that of nationalist–ideological philosophy; therefore, Hume’s and Kant’s ideas about race are incorrect.
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  9. Estilo literario y reflexión filosófica en el siglo XVIII: Hume y Rousseau sobre el suicidio.Valeria Schuster - 2017 - Revista de Filosofía y Teoría Política 48 (1):012-012.
    This research focuses on the comparison of Hume ´s essay On Suicide and the letters XXI y XXII present in the third book of Julia or the New Heloise written by Rouseeau, that were published together by an anonymous editor in England in 1783. We will analyse the arguments present in both texts, the different reactions the audience of that time had and the possible common sources between them. On the basis of this study, the second attempt of this paper (...)
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  10. ‘Slaves Among Us’: The Climate and Character of Eighteenth-Century Philosophical Discussions of Slavery.Margaret Watkins - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (1):e12393.
    This article introduces several aspects of eighteenth-century discussions of slavery that may be unfamiliar or surprising to present-day readers. First, even eighteenth-century philosophers who were opponents of slavery often exhibited marked racism and helped develop racial concepts that would later serve pro-slavery theorists. Such thinkers include Hume, Voltaire, and Kant. Second, we must see slavery debates in the context of larger scientific and political debates, including those about climate and character, just political systems, the superiority or inferiority of the moderns (...)
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  11. Sharing the Earth: A Biocentric Account of Ecological Justice.Anna Wienhues - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (3):367-385.
    Although ethical and justice arguments operate in two distinct levels—justice being a more specific concept—they can easily be conflated. A robust justification of ecological justice requires starting at the roots of justice, rather than merely giving, for example, an argument for why certain non-human beings have moral standing of some kind. Thus, I propose that a theory of ecological justice can benefit from a four-step justification for the inclusion of non-human beings into the community of justice, starting with Hume’s circumstances (...)
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  12. Hume, Justice and Sympathy: A Reversal of the Natural Order?Sophie Botros - 2015 - Diametros 44:110-139.
    Hume’s view that the object of moral feeling is a natural passion, motivating action, causes problems for justice. There is apparently no appropriate natural motive, whilst, if there were, its “partiality” would unfit it to ground the requisite impartial approval. We offer a critique of such solutions as that the missing non-moral motive is enlightened self-interest, or that it is feigned, or that it consists in a just disposition. We reject Cohon’s postulation of a moral motive for just acts, and (...)
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  13. Counseling Hume.Elliot D. Cohen - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Practice 3 (4):28-38.
    David Hume is well known for his philosophical doubts about such things as whether there is an external world beyond our sense perception, and whether there are any rational grounds for believing that the future will resemble the past. But what would it be like to entertain such doubts in the context of one’s everyday life? In this paper, a fictional dialogue is provided in which a descendent of David Hume who brings such skeptical doubts to life, and consequently suffers (...)
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  14. Hume on Animals and the Rest of Nature.Angela Coventry & Avram Hiller - 2014 - In John Hadley & Elisa Aaltola (eds.), Animal Ethics and Philosophy: Questioning the Orthodoxy. Rowman and Littlefield International.
    This paper develops a Humean environmental meta-ethic to apply to the animal world and, given some further considerations, to the rest of nature. Our interpretation extends Hume’s account of sympathy, our natural ability to sympathize with the emotions of others, so that we may sympathize not only with human beings but also animals, plants and ecosystems as well. Further, we suggest that Hume has the resources for an account of environmental value that applies to non-human animals, non-sentient elements of nature (...)
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  15. Il buon soldato e l’agente virtuoso: Hume e la military glory.Lorenzo Greco - 2014 - In Maurizio Balistreri, Maurizio Benato & Maurizio Mori (eds.), Etica medica nella vita militare: per iniziare una riflessione, vol. 1. Value – Ananke. pp. 107-115.
  16. David Hume and the Scottish Enlightenment.Gerhard Engel - 2013 - In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer. pp. 253--279.
  17. Two Philosophical Deaths: Hume and Hitchens.Franklin G. Miller - 2013 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (2):251-258.
    What is a good death? How does one live well in the face of (potentially) terminal illness? Philosophical analysis has a great deal to offer in approaching these puzzling and deep questions. Perhaps more can be gleaned of cultural and personal significance, however, from narratives of those who have been forced to face these questions in their lives and in their writings. The greatest yield, I suggest, comes from combining narrative with philosophical reflections.Commentators have frequently contrasted the way we die (...)
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  18. Hume on Suicide.Gordon B. Mower - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (5):563-575.
    This essay examines Hume?s attitude to suicide, in which he had an ongoing philosophical interest, as found in the dialogue at the end of An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, and in his brief essay on the topic. His attitude to, arguments, and views on suicide are placed in the context of his other writings and biographical elements from his own life. The views of other early modern thinkers to suicide, Locke, Kant, and Montaigne, are presented and their arguments (...)
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  19. ‘A Steady Contempt of Life’: Suicide Narratives in Hume and Others.Max Grober - 2012 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (1):51-68.
    In a letter of 1746, David Hume tells of the suicide of his kinsman Major Forbes. While Hume's account overtly presents the major's suicide as heroic, incorporating allusions to the Ajax of Sophocles and the lives of noble Romans such as Cato, the narrative context in which he places it, and the nature of narrative itself, call the wisdom of the act into question. In his essay ‘Of Suicide’, written a few years later, Hume largely avoids narrative examples. However, the (...)
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  20. Hume’s Theory of Business Ethics Revisited.William Kline - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):163-174.
    Hume’s examination of the conventions of property, trade, and contract addresses the moral foundations that make business possible. In this light, Hume’s theory of justice is also a foundational work in business ethics. In Hume’s analysis of these conventions, both philosophers and game theorists have correctly identified “proto” game-theoretic elements. One of the few attempts to offer a Humean theory of business ethics rests on this game-theoretic interpretation of Hume’s argument. This article argues that game-theoretic reasoning is only one part (...)
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  21. Hume and Care Ethics.Michael Slote - 2012 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 25 (3):557-571.
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  22. Dirty Hands and the Romance of the Ticking Bomb Terrorist: A Humean Account.Christopher J. Finlay - 2011 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (4):421-442.
    On Michael Walzer's influential account, "dirty hands" characterizes the political leader's choice between absolutist moral demands (to abstain from torture) and consequentialist political reasoning (to do what is necessary to prevent the loss of innocent lives). The impulse to torture a "ticking bomb terrorist" is therefore at least partly pragmatic, straining against morality, while the desire to uphold a ban on torture is purely and properly a moral one. I challenge this Machiavellian view by reinterpreting the dilemma in the framework (...)
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  23. Commentary on Sheldon Wein's "IUDs, STIs, and DNA : Reconsidering Hume's Modesty Proposal".Jennifer Parks - 2011 - In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
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  24. ""Reseña Del Libro" Sul Suicidio E Altri Saggi Scelti", de D. Hume.Alberto Giovanni Biuso - 2010 - Giornale di Metafisica 32 (1):169-170.
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  25. Hume’s Knave and Nonanthropocentric Virtues.Paul Haught - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):129-43.
    This essay offers a critical assessment of environmental virtue ethics (EVE). Finding an environmental ethical analogy with Hume’s critique of the sensible knave, I argue that EVE is limited in much the same way as morality is on the Humean view. Advocates of nonanthropocentrism will find it difficult to engage those whose virtues comport them to anthropocentrism. Nonetheless, EVE is able to ground confidence in nonanthropocentric virtues by explicating specific key virtues, thereby holding open the possibility of bridging the motivational (...)
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  26. Sentimentalism and Metaphysical Beliefs.Noriaki Iwasa - 2010 - Prolegomena 9 (2):271-286.
    This essay first introduces the moral sense theories of Francis Hutcheson, David Hume, and Adam Smith, and clarifies important differences between them. It then examines whether moral judgment based on the moral sense or moral sentiments varies according to one's metaphysical beliefs. For this, the essay mainly applies those theories to such issues as stem cell research, abortion, and active euthanasia. In all three theories, false religious beliefs can distort moral judgment. In Hutcheson's theory, answers to stem cell research, abortion, (...)
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  27. Sentimentalizam i metafizička vjerovanja.Noriaki Iwasa - 2010 - Prolegomena 9 (2):271-286.
    U ovome ogledu najprije uvodim u teorije moralnog osjećaja Francisa Hutchesona, Davida Humea i Adama Smitha te razjašnjavam važne razlike među njima. Potom ispitujem da li moralni sud koji se zasniva na moralnom osjećaju varira ovisno o metafizičkim vjerovanjima. U tu svrhu te teorije uglavnom primjenjujem na pitanja kao što su istraživanje matičnih stanica, pobačaj i aktivna eutanazija. U svim trima teorijama neistinita religijska vjerovanja mogu iskriviti moralni sud. U Hutchesonovoj teoriji odgovori na problem istraživanja matičnih stanica, pobačaja i aktivne (...)
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  28. L'invention des conventions de justice chez Hume et sa skepsis envers la rétribution.Ignace Haaz - 2009 - In Philippe Saltel (ed.), L'invention philosophique humienne. Vrin - Recherches sur la philosophie et le langage No 26. pp. 235-272.
    Promise keeping and the virtue of integrity are understandable only if the sense of justice and of injustice doesn't come from nature but results from education and of some of the most inventive human conventions. We comment this argument that we find in the Treatise of Nature, book III and present how it impacts the notion of retribution and punishment in general.
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  29. Hume, Callicott, and the Land Ethic: Prospects and Problems.Jennifer Welchman - 2009 - Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (2):201-220.
    Aldo Leopold's holistic land ethic principle, ‘‘a thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community … wrong when it tends otherwise,’’ has seemed to many philosophers indefensible in light of any of the traditional normative theories of character and conduct that have been central to Western moral theory since the early modern period. J. Baird Callicott has long disputed this assessment, arguing that in fact, Leopold's land ethic is best understood and (...)
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  30. Her Conclusions--With Which He Is in Love: Why Hume Would Fancy Anscombe.Margaret Watkins - 2008 - Christian Bioethics 14 (2):175-186.
    Elizabeth Anscombe tangos with Hume in the middle of her march toward the three theses of "Modern Moral Philosophy" that we should abandon moral philosophy "until we have an adequate philosophy of psychology"; that the concepts of moral obligation and moral duty, of what is morally right and wrong, and of the moral sense of 'ought' "ought to be jettisoned if this is psychologically possible;" and that "the differences between the well-known English writers on moral philosophy from Sidgwick to the (...)
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  31. A Humean Approach to Assessing the Moral Significance of Ultra-Violent Video Games.Monique Wonderly - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):1-10.
    Although the word empathy only recently came into existence, eighteenth century philosopher, David Hume, significantly contributed to our current understanding of the term. Hume was among the first to suggest that an empathic mechanism is the central means by which we make ethical judgments and glean moral knowledge. In this paper, I explore Hume's moral sentimentalism, and I argue that his conception of empathy provides a surprisingly apposite framework for interpreting and addressing a current issue in practical ethics: the moral (...)
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  32. Hume’s Projectivist Legacy for Environmental Ethics.Paul Haught - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (1):77-96.
    Hume’s projectivist theory of value suggests that (environmental) values are either individually or culturally relative and that intrinsic value ascriptions are incoherent. Previous attempts to avert these implications have typically relied on modified Humean accounts that either universalize human sensitivity to the value of the more-than-human world or that adapt the concept of intrinsic value to suit a world in which all values are projected. While there are merits to these approaches, there is another alternative. Hume’s own moral theory promises (...)
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  33. Making and Finding Values in Nature: From a Humean Point of View.Y. S. Lo - 2006 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):123 – 147.
    The paper advances a Humean metaethical analysis of "intrinsic value" - a notion fundamental in moral philosophy in general and particularly so in environmental ethics. The analysis reduces an object's moral properties (e.g., its value) to the empirical relations between the object's natural properties and people's psychological dispositions to respond to them. Moral properties turn out to be both objective and subjective, but in ways compatible with, and complementary to, each other. Next, the paper investigates whether the Humean analysis can (...)
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  34. Religion and Moral Prohibition in Hume’s “Of Suicide”.Thomas Holden - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (2):189-210.
    This paper presents a new analysis of the logical structure of Hume’s attack on the theological objection to suicide. I suggest that Hume intends his reasoning in “Of Suicide” to generalize, covering not just suicide but any arbitrary action: his implied conclusion is that no human action can violate a duty to God. I contrast my reading with a series of recent interpretations, and argue that the various criticisms of Hume’s reasoning are based on a misunderstanding of what he is (...)
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  35. Feminist Interpretations of David Hume.Cathy Kemp - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):206-209.
  36. May One Kill Oneself? The Classical Arguments Concerning Suicide in Thomas Aquinas and David Hume.H. Busche - 2004 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 111 (1):62-89.
  37. Darf man sich selbst töten?: Die klassischen Argumente bei Thomas von Aquin und David Hume.Hubertus Busche - 2004 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 111 (1):62-89.
  38. Hume and Our Treatment of Animals.Monica L. Gerrek - 2004 - Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):13.
    This paper is concerned with the bias in favor of the interests of the members of some species of non- human animals and against the interests of the members of other species of non-human animals. This view, which I call modified speciesism, is perhaps related to Singer’s speciesism, but neither entails nor is entailed by it. The argument takes the following form: given that exploited animals are morally equivalent to non-exploited animals and given that non-exploited animals are morally entitled to (...)
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  39. David Hume's Moral Philosophy and Environmental Ethics.Paul Andrew Haught - 2004 - Dissertation, Tulane University
    In this dissertation I explore the relation of David Hume's moral philosophy to environmental ethics. J. Baird Callicott argues that Hume's moral sentimentalism provides a subjectivist framework for respecting the intrinsic value of species and ecosystems. I agree with Callicott's subjectivist reading of Hume, but I question his decision to deploy Hume's moral sentimentalism directly in terms of value theory. Remaining as faithful to Hume's theory as possible, I reconsider his moral philosophy in the context of environmental virtue ethics and (...)
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  40. Sympathy as a “Natural”.Robert C. Solomon - 2004 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2004:53-58.
    In this essay, I want to reconsider sympathy as a “natural” emotion or sentiment. Adam Smith famously defended it as such (as did his friend David Hume) but both used the term ambiguously and in a different sense than we use it today. Nevertheless, it seems to me that Smith got it quite right, that the basis of morality and justice is to be found in the realm of affect rather than in theory and principles alone, and that sympathy is (...)
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  41. Looking for Answers in All the Wrong Places.Earl W. Spurgin - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (2):293-313.
    In recent years, many business ethicists have raised problems with the “ethics pays” credo. Despite these problems, many continue to hold it. I argue that support for the credo leads business ethicists away from a potentially fruitful approach found in Hume’s moral philosophy. I begin by demonstrating that attempts to support the credo fail because proponents are trying to provide an answer to the “Why be moral?” question that is based on rational self-interest. Then, I show that Hume’s sentiments-based moral (...)
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  42. Hume on Animal Reason.Deborah Boyle - 2003 - Hume Studies 29 (1):3-28.
    In both the _Treatise and the first _Enquiry, Hume offers an argument from analogy comparing how humans and animals make causal inferences. Yet in these and other texts, he suggests that there are certain differences between human and animal reasoning. This paper discusses Hume's argument from analogy, and examines how Hume can argue for differences in human and animal reasoning without having to attribute to either a special capacity that the other lacks. Hume's empiricism and his claims about sympathy also (...)
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  43. A Pluralistic Humean Environmental Ethic: Dealing with the Individualism-Holism Problem.Jason P. Matzke - 2003 - Dissertation, Michigan State University
    Environmental ethicists often argue for ethical holism, granting moral standing to ecosystems and species. However, this conflicts with traditional ethics and commonsense which attribute moral standing to individual organisms based on characteristics wholes do not possess, such as sentience or autonomy. Despite the apparent inconsistencies between these two approaches, any acceptable holistic environmental ethic must account also for these individual-oriented convictions. This is the individualism---holism problem. Marry Anne Warren and J. Baird Callicott have each offered solutions which they claim are (...)
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  44. Hume on Morals and Animals.Tony Pitson - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):639 – 655.
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  45. Hume's Racism and His Case Against the Miraculous.Hendrik van der Breggen - 2002 - Philosophia Christi 4 (2):427-442.
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  46. Do Children Get Their Fair Share of Health and Dental Care?Loretta M. Kopelman & Wendy E. Mouradian - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (2):127 – 136.
  47. Non-Humean Holism, Un-Humean Holism.Y. S. Lo - 2001 - Environmental Values 10 (1):113-123.
    In this article I argue that textual evidence from David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature does not support J. Baird Callicott's professedly Humean yet holistic environmental ethic, which understands the community as a 'metaorganismic' entity 'over and above' its individual members. Based on Hume's reductionist account of the mind and his assimilation of the metaphysical nature of the mind to that of the community, I also argue that a Humean account of the community should be likewise reductionist. My conclusion (...)
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  48. A Humean Argument for the Land Ethic?Y. S. Lo - 2001 - Environmental Values 10 (4):523-539.
    This article examines an allegedly Humean solution provided by J. Baird Callicott to the problem of the is/ought dichotomy. It also examines an allegedly Humean argument provided by him for the land ethic's summary moral precept. It concludes that neither the solution nor the argument is Humean or cogent.
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  49. Hume and the Theistic Objection to Suicide.G. R. McLean - 2001 - American Philosophical Quarterly 38 (1):99 - 111.
  50. Hume's Legacy.Pamela J. Salsberry - 2001 - Nursing Philosophy 2 (2):180-182.
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