13 found
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  1.  16
    The Social Licence for Research: Whycare.Dataran Into Trouble.Pam Carter, Graeme T. Laurie & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):404-409.
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  2.  2
    Revising Ethical Guidance for the Evaluation of Programmes and Interventions Not Initiated by Researchers.Samuel I. Watson, Mary Dixon-Woods, Celia A. Taylor, Emily B. Wroe, Elizabeth L. Dunbar, Peter J. Chilton & Richard J. Lilford - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):26-30.
    Public health and service delivery programmes, interventions and policies are typically developed and implemented for the primary purpose of effecting change rather than generating knowledge. Nonetheless, evaluations of these programmes may produce valuable learning that helps determine effectiveness and costs as well as informing design and implementation of future programmes. Such studies might be termed ‘opportunistic evaluations’, since they are responsive to emergent opportunities rather than being studies of interventions that are initiated or designed by researchers. However, current ethical guidance (...)
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  3.  14
    Regulation and the Social Licence for Medical Research.Mary Dixon-Woods & Richard E. Ashcroft - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):381-391.
    Regulation and governance of medical research is frequently criticised by researchers. In this paper, we draw on Everett Hughes’ concepts of professional licence and professional mandate, and on contemporary sociological theory on risk regulation, to explain the emergence of research governance and the kinds of criticism it receives. We offer explanations for researcher criticism of the rules and practices of research governance, suggesting that these are perceived as interference in their mandate. We argue that, in spite of their complaints, researchers (...)
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  4.  27
    Including Qualitative Research in Systematic Reviews: Opportunities and Problems.Mary Dixon-Woods, Ray Fitzpatrick & Karen Roberts - 2001 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (2):125-133.
  5. Commodification of Body Parts: By Medicine or by Media?Clive Seale, Debbie Cavers & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2006 - Body and Society 12 (1):25-42.
    Commentators frequently point to the involvement of biomedicine and bio-science in the objectification and commodification of human body parts, and the consequent potential for violation of personal, social and community meanings. Through a study of UK media coverage of controversies associated with the removal of body parts and human materials from children, we argue that an exclusive emphasis on the role of medicine and the bio-sciences in the commodification of human materials ignores the important role played by commercially motivated mass (...)
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  6.  15
    A Qualitative Study of Participants’ Views on Re-Consent in a Longitudinal Biobank.Mary Dixon-Woods, David Kocman, Liz Brewster, Janet Willars, Graeme Laurie & Carolyn Tarrant - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):22.
    Biomedical research increasingly relies on long-term studies involving use and re-use of biological samples and data stored in large repositories or “biobanks” over lengthy periods, often raising questions about whether and when a re-consenting process should be activated. We sought to investigate the views on re-consent of participants in a longitudinal biobank. We conducted a qualitative study involving interviews with 24 people who were participating in a longitudinal biobank. Their views were elicited using a semi-structured interview schedule and scenarios based (...)
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  7.  72
    Subject Positions in Research Ethics Committee Letters: A Discursive Analysis.Michelle O'Reilly, Natalie Armstrong & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (4):187-194.
    Ethical review of applications to conduct research projects continues to be a focus of scrutiny and controversy. We argue that attention to the actual practices of ethical review has the potential to inform debate. We explore how research ethics committees (RECs) establish their position and authority through the texts they use in their correspondence with applicants. Using a discursive analysis applied to 260 letters, we identify four positions of particular interest: RECs positioned as disinterested and responsible; as representing the interests (...)
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  8. The Social Forms and Functions of Bioethics in the United Kingdom.Richard E. Ashcroft & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2011 - In Catherine Myser (ed.), Bioethics Around the Globe. Oxford University Press.
     
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  9. Mixed‐Methods Exploration of Views on Choice in a University Asymptomatic COVID‐19 Testing Programme.Caitríona Cox, Akbar Ansari, Meredith McLaughlin, Jan W. Scheer, Jennifer Bousfield, Jenny George, Brandi Leach, Sarah Parkinson & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (4):434-444.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 434-444, May 2022.
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  10.  1
    Mixed-Methods Exploration of Views on Choice in a University Asymptomatic COVID-19 Testing Programme.Caitríona Cox, Akbar Ansari, Meredith McLaughlin, Jan W. van der Scheer, Jennifer Bousfield, Jenny George, Brandi Leach, Sarah Parkinson & Mary Dixon-Woods - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  11.  10
    Style Matters: An Analysis of 100 Research Ethics Committee Decision Letters.Emma L. Angell & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2008 - Research Ethics 4 (3):101-105.
    Disquiet about the research ethics review process has, historically, been anecdotal and often takes the form of ‘atrocity stories’ from researchers about the bureaucratic nature of the application process or inconsistency and capriciousness in decision-making. However, systematic evidence has often been lacking. We analysed 100 decision letters written by NHS research ethics committees. We found evidence of poor communication in the way in which REC decisions were conveyed to applicants. Typos and grammatical mistakes were found in almost 30% of letters; (...)
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  12.  3
    What Can Data Trusts for Health Research Learn From Participatory Governance in Biobanks?Richard Milne, Annie Sorbie & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (5):323-328.
    New models of data governance for health data are a focus of growing interest in an era of challenge to the social licence. In this article, we reflect on what the data trust model, which is founded on principles of participatory governance, can learn from experiences of involving and engagement of members of the public and participants in the governance of large-scale biobanks. We distinguish between upstream and ongoing governance models, showing how they require careful design and operation if they (...)
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  13.  1
    Randomised Evaluation of Government Health Programmes Does Present a Challenge to Standard Research Ethics Frameworks.Samuel I. Watson, Mary Dixon-Woods & Richard J. Lilford - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):34-35.
    In a recent issue of Journal of Medical Ethics, we discussed the ethical review of evaluations of interventions that would occur whether or not the evaluation was taking place. We concluded that standard research ethics frameworks including the Ottawa Statement, which requires justification for all aspects of an intervention and its roll-out, were a poor guide in this area. We proposed that a consideration of researcher responsibility, based on the consequences of the research taking place, would be a more appropriate (...)
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