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  1.  70
    Forgiveness and Power.John Gingell - 1974 - Analysis 34 (6):180 - 183.
  2. Philosophy and Educational Policy: A Critical Introduction.Christopher Winch & John Gingell - 2006 - British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (1):108-110.
     
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  3.  31
    Educational assessment: Reply to Andrew Davis.Christopher Winch & John Gingell - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 30 (3):377–388.
    Assessment is at the heart of teaching as it provides a necessary condition for judging success or failure. It is also necessary to ensure that providers of education are accountable to users and providers of resources. Inferential hazard is an inescapable part of any assessment procedure but cannot be an argument against assessment as such. Rich knowledge may be the aim of education but it does not follow that it is the aim of every stage of education. Teaching to tests (...)
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  4.  26
    Educational Assessment: reply to Andrew Davis.Christopher Winch & John Gingell - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 30 (3):377-388.
    Assessment is at the heart of teaching as it provides a necessary condition for judging success or failure. It is also necessary to ensure that providers of education are accountable to users and providers of resources. Inferential hazard is an inescapable part of any assessment procedure but cannot be an argument against assessment as such. Rich knowledge may be the aim of education but it does not follow that it is the aim of every stage of education. Teaching to tests (...)
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  5.  38
    Is Educational Research Any Use?John Gingell & Christopher Winch - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (1):77-91.
    We begin by examining the widespread scepticism about the value of empirical educational research that is found within sections of the philosophy of education community. We argue that this scepticism, in its strongest form, is incoherent as it suggests that there are no educational facts susceptible of discovery. On the other hand, if there are such facts, then commonsense is not an adequate way of accessing them, due to its own contested and variable nature. We go on to examine the (...)
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  6. Forgiveness and power.John Gingell - 1974 - Analysis 34 (6):180.
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  7.  48
    Introduction.Christopher Winch & John Gingell - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (5):479–483.
  8.  10
    The Evolution of the Thought of Richard Peters: Neglected Aspects.Christopher Winch & John Gingell - 2023 - SATS 24 (1):29-51.
    Peters is best known for ‘Ethics and Education’, (1966) an attempt, using analytical methods, to provide a universal canonical account of the nature of education. This corresponded closely with the prevailing conception of liberal education of the time. Despite the acclaim with which this work was received, Peters became increasingly dissatisfied with his early views of education and in a series of papers written between 1973 and 1982, he retreated slowly from the view that one could construct a universal canonical (...)
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  9.  19
    Curiouser and curiouser: Davis, white and assessment.John Gingell & Christopher Winch - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (4):673–685.
    Continuing the debate on assessment, we argue that Andrew Davis' use of examples fails to address issues in the assessibility of specific items of knowledge, and show that one of his examples supports our view rather than his. We argue that John White's preferred replacement of assessment by monitoring, based on teachers' personal knowledge of their pupils, confuses personal and professional knowledge, oversimplifies the teacher's role and does not address the need for objectivity. Finally we argue that neither White nor (...)
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  10.  21
    Curiouser and Curiouser: Davis, White and Assessment.John Gingell & Christopher Winch - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (4):673-685.
    Continuing the debate on assessment, we argue that Andrew Davis' use of examples fails to address issues in the assessibility of specific items of knowledge, and show that one of his examples supports our view rather than his. We argue that John White's preferred replacement of assessment by monitoring, based on teachers' personal knowledge of their pupils, confuses personal and professional knowledge, oversimplifies the teacher's role and does not address the need for objectivity. Finally we argue that neither White nor (...)
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  11.  10
    Education and the visual arts: a reply to my critics.John Gingell - 2007 - In Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Newsletter 2007. pp. 23-27.
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  12.  3
    Education and the common good: essays in honor of Robin Barrow.John Gingell & Robin Barrow (eds.) - 2014 - New York: Routledge.
    Robin Barrow has been one of the leading philosophers of education for more than forty years. This book is a critical but appreciative examination of his work by some of the leading philosophers of education at work today, with responses from Professor Barrow. It will focus on his work on curriculum, the analytic tradition in philosophy, education and schooling, and his use of Greek philosophy to enrich current debates in the subject. This work will be of interest to all those (...)
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  13.  7
    In Defence of High Culture.John Gingell & Ed Brandon - 2001 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    The authors attempt to outline a notion of high culture and its role within education, following a broad modern tradition springing from Matthew Arnold. The book is written with a concern for clarity and argument that is not always found within that tradition, and the authors reject the elitist conclusions of many who have followed the tradition, such as Eliot, Leavis, Bantock and Scruton.
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  14. Philosophy of Education: The Key Concepts.John Gingell & Christopher Winch - 1999 - New York: Routledge. Edited by John Gingell & Christopher Winch.
    This new edition of _Philosophy of Education: The Key Concepts_ is an easy to use A-Z guide summarizing all the key terms, ideas and issues central to the study of educational theory today. Fully updated, the book is cross-referenced throughout and contains pointers to further reading, as well as new entries on such topics as: Citizenship and Civic Education Liberalism Capability Well-being Patriotism Globalisation Open-mindedness Creationism and Intelligent Design. Comprehensive and authoritative this highly accessible guide provides all that a student, (...)
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  15. Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Newsletter 2007.John Gingell (ed.) - 2007
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  16.  8
    The concept of intelligence: a reply to Michael Hand.John Gingell - 2007 - London Review of Education 5 (1):47-49.
    Michael Hand's interesting analysis of the concept of intelligence crucially depends upon three assumptions: firstly, that there is an ordinary use of the term which, when applied to an individual is perfectly general and not context dependent. Secondly, that this use is best cashed in terms of aptitude. Thirdly, that the aptitude in question is to be explained in terms of theorizing. I shall argue in what follows that the first assumption may be true, but, if it is true, this (...)
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  17.  6
    The justification for teaching the visual arts in schools.John Gingell - unknown
    The justifications that are usually offered - in England - for teaching the arts are either in terms of the development of "creativity" or the possibility of self expression, or, in terms of moral and social education. I examine both types of claim and reject them. In their place I offer justifications in terms of intrinsic value and enculturisation.
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  18.  5
    Preface.John Gingell & E. P. Brandon - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (3):5-5.