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  1. In Favour of Freezing Eggs for Non-Medical Reasons.Imogen Goold & Julian Savulescu - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (1):47-58.
    This article explores the social benefits and moral arguments in favour of women and couples freezing eggs and embryos for social reasons. Social IVF promotes equal participation by women in employment; it offers women more time to choose a partner; it provides better opportunities for the child as it allows couples more time to become financially stable; it may reduce the risk of genetic and chromosomal abnormality; it allows women and couples to have another child if circumstances change; it offers (...)
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    Freezing Eggs for Lifestyle Reasons.Julian Savulescu & Imogen Goold - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):32 – 35.
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  3.  5
    Persons, Parts and Property: How Should We Regulate Human Tissue in the 21st Century?Imogen Goold, Jonathan Herring, Kate Greasley & Loane Skene (eds.) - 2014 - Hart Publishing.
    The contributions in this volume represent a detailed exploration of the salient legal and theoretical puzzles arising out of the body-as-property question, and a collation of the broad spectrum of analyses on offer.
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    Why Does It Matter How We Regulate the Use of Human Body Parts?Imogen Goold - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):3-9.
    Human tissue and body parts have been used in one way or another for millennia. They have been preserved and displayed, both in museums and public shows. Real human hair is used for wigs, while some artists even use human tissue in their works. Blood, bone marrow, whole organs and a host of other structures and human substances are all transplanted into living persons to treat illness. New life can be created from gametes through in vitro fertilisation , while the (...)
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    Should Older and Postmenopausal Women Have Access to Assisted Reproductive Technology?Imogen Goold - 2005 - Monash Bioethics Review 24 (1):27-46.
    In vitro fertilisation and other assisted reproductive technologies now enable many women to have children, who would otherwise have remained childless. The most obvious application for these technologies is to help physically infertile, but otherwise healthy young women to have children. However, increasingly, other groups are seeking access to ART to conceive, raising ethical questions about who should be allowed to use these technologies to bear children. In particular, the question of access to ART by lesbian couples and single women (...)
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    Withholding Artificial Nutrition and Hydration.Imogen Goold - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):541-542.
    This special issue, Withholding artificial nutrition and hydration, comprises several papers, commentaries and responses centred largely around the issues raised by the 2011 decision of the English Court of Protection in W v M.i In that case, the mother of an adult patient applied for the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment . In 2003, the patient, M, had contracted viral encephalitis and suffered irreparable brain damage as a result. She fell into a coma, and when she emerged appeared to be in (...)
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    The Human Body as Property? Possession, Control and Commodification.Imogen Goold, Loane Skene, Jonathan Herring & Kate Greasley - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):1-2.
    In the wake of three high-profile judicial decisions concerning the use of human biological materials, the editors of this collection felt in 2011 that there was a need for detailed scholarly exploration of the ethical and legal implications of these decisions. For centuries, it seemed that in Australia and England and Wales, individuals did not have any proprietary interests in their excised tissue. Others might acquire such interests, but there had been no clear decision on the rights or otherwise of (...)
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    Highlights From This Issue.Imogen Goold - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):577-578.
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    Highlights From This Issue.Imogen Goold - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):133-134.
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