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Christopher Morgan-Knapp
State University of New York at Binghamton
  1. Consequentialism, Climate Harm and Individual Obligations.Christopher Morgan-Knapp & Charles Goodman - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (1):177-190.
    Does the decision to relax by taking a drive rather than by taking a walk cause harm? In particular, do the additional carbon emissions caused by such a decision make anyone worse off? Recently several philosophers have argued that the answer is no, and on this basis have gone on to claim that act-consequentialism cannot provide a moral reason for individuals to voluntarily reduce their emissions. The reasoning typically consists of two steps. First, the effect of individual emissions on the (...)
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  2.  25
    Comparative Pride.Christopher Morgan-Knapp - 2019 - Philosophical Quarterly 69 (275):315-331.
    Comparative pride—that is, pride in how one compares to others in some respect—is often thought to be warranted. In this paper, I argue that this common position is mistaken. The paper begins with an analysis of how things seem when a person feels pride. Pride, I claim, presents some aspect of the self with which one identifies as being worthy. Moreover, in some cases, it presents this aspect of the self as something one is responsible for. I then go on (...)
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  3.  44
    Nonconsequentialist Precaution.Christopher Morgan-Knapp - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (4):785-797.
    How cautious should regulators be? A standard answer is consequentialist: regulators should be just cautious enough to maximize expected social value. This paper charts the prospects of a nonconsequentialist - and more precautionary - alternative. More specifically, it argues that a contractualism focused on ex ante consent can motivate the following regulatory criterion: regulators should permit a socially beneficial risky activity only if no one can be expected to be made worse off by it. Broadly speaking, there are two strategies (...)
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  4.  38
    Economic Envy.Christopher Morgan-Knapp - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):113-126.
    Envy of others' material possessions is a potent motivator of consumerism. This makes it a prudentially and morally hazardous emotional response. After outlining these hazards, I present an analysis of the emotion of envy. Envy, I argue, presents things in the following way: the envier lacks some good that her rival possesses; this difference between them is bad for the envier; this difference reflects poorly on the envier's worth; and this difference is undeserved. I then discuss the conditions under which (...)
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  5.  15
    The Environmental Case Against Employmentism.Christopher Morgan-Knapp - 2020 - Tandf: Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (1):70-84.
    Since materially opulent lifestyles are a significant cause of environmental degradation, environmentalists often call for us to live more simply. This call is typically focused on consumption. But our environmental footprint is a function of our paid work as well as our purchases. Consequently, environmentalists should also urge us to work less. Defending this claim is the project of this paper. Reducing our economic productivity, I argue, can often be expected to make both the world and our characters better. And, (...)
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  6.  46
    A Thoreauvian Account of Prudential Value.Christopher Morgan-Knapp - 2014 - Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):419-435.
    This article develops and defends an account of prudential value that is inspired by ideas found in Thoreau’s Walden. The core claim is that prudential value consists in responding appropriately to those things that make the world better, and avoiding those things that make it worse. The core argument is that this is our aim in so far as we are evaluative creatures, and that our evaluative nature is essential to us in the context of inquiring into our good. I (...)
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    Fairness, Individuality, and Free Riding.Christopher Morgan-Knapp - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
    According to most contemporary theorists, free riding on the cooperative contributions of others is unfair. At the same time, obligations to contribute to cooperative schemes can compel conformity with conventional practices, and can do so to a degree that poses a real threat to individuality. This paper exposes this tension between fairness and individuality, and proposes a way to resolve it. The resolution depends on an alternative approach to understanding fairness—one that appeals to the relational goods fairness is meant to (...)
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  8.  30
    Materialism and Economics.Christopher Morgan-Knapp - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):27 – 30.
    Chrisoula Andreou argues that even if our happiness is determined by our material standard of living, our standard of living could be lowered without lowering our happiness. In this response, I show how this claim can be challenged on both conceptual and empirical grounds. Conceptually, how justified we are in believing her claim depends on how we conceive of the 'we' it refers to. Empirically, there is economic evidence in tension with each of the several interpretations her position admits of. (...)
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    Editor’s Introduction.Christopher Morgan-Knapp - 2013 - Binghamton Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):1-2.
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