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  1.  29
    Gandhi and Ambedkar: Irreconcilable Differences?Aakash Singh - 2014 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 18 (3):413-449.
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  2.  8
    Indian Political Thought: A Reader.Aakash Singh & Silika Mohapatra (eds.) - 2010 - Routledge.
    This Reader provides a comprehensive introduction to the study of contemporary Indian political theory. Tracing the development of the discipline and offering a clear presentation of the most influential literature in the field, it brings together contributions by outstanding and well-known academics on contemporary Indian political thought. The Reader weaves together relevant works from the social sciences — sociology, anthropology, law, history, philosophy, feminist and postcolonial theory — which shape the nature of political thought in India today. Themes both unique (...)
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  3.  9
    Reading Hegel : The Introductions.Aakash Singh & Rimina Mohapatra (eds.) - 2008 - re. press.
    This book incorporates seven 'Introductions' that Hegel wrote for each of his major works: the Phenomenology, Logic, Philosophy of Right, History, Fine Art, Religion and History of Philosophy, and includes an Introduction and Epilogue by the Editors, serving to introduce Hegel to the reader and to situate him and his works into their wider context.
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  4. Eros Turannos: Leo Strauss & Alexandre Kojeve Debate on Tyranny.Aakash Singh - 2005 - Upa.
    Eros Turannos analyzes the debates between Leo Strauss and Alexandre Kojeve. Their debates are contextualized through the Platonic notion of a likeness between the psuche and the polis . This classical notion is updated through contemporary philosopher William Desmond's linked accounts of eros and tyranny.
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  5. Phantasie, Recognition, Memory – Comparing Fichte And Hegel On Language.Aakash Singh - 2001 - Minerva 5:94-117.
    The author compares the linguistic philosophies of Fichte and Hegel, concluding that Hegel's position ismore comprehensive than Fichte's. Fichte and Hegel share essential suppositions about language andphilosophy, best seen in their remarks on Phantasie, schematism, and especially the idea of unity. The issueof recognition is the primary point of difference between them. Fichte sees man's desire for recognition inthe transformation of signs from visual to audible; for Hegel, however, man's desire forrecognition is prior to Fichte's placement of it. Whereas for (...)
     
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  6.  12
    Reading Hegel: Hegel's Introductions/GWF Hegel.Aakash Singh & Rimina Mohapatra (eds.) - 2008 - Melbourne, Australia: re.press.
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  7.  17
    Kojeve's Masters and Slaves, Kurosawa's Samurai and Farmer.Aakash Singh - 2003 - Film-Philosophy 7 (5).
    _Seven Samurai_ Directed by Akira Kurosawa Japan, 1954.
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  8.  11
    Dedication.Aakash Singh - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):645-647.
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  9.  11
    Introduction: Rethinking Fundamentalism in a Post-Secular Age.Aakash Singh - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):649-653.
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  10.  4
    Phantasie, Recognition, Memory- Comparing Fichte and Hegel on Language.Aakash Singh - 2001 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 5 (1).
    The author compares the linguistic philosophies of Fichte and Hegel, concluding that Hegel's position is more comprehensive than Fichte's. Fichte and Hegel share essential suppositions about language and philosophy, best seen in their remarks on Phantasie, schematism, and especially the idea of unity. The issue of recognition is the primary point of difference between them. Fichte sees man's desire for recognition in the transformation of signs from visual to audible; for Hegel, however, man's desire for recognition is prior to Fichte's (...)
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