What is a Human?: Toward psychological benchmarks in the field of human–robot interaction

Interaction Studies 8 (3):363-390 (2007)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

In this paper, we move toward offering psychological benchmarks to measure success in building increasingly humanlike robots. By psychological benchmarks we mean categories of interaction that capture conceptually fundamental aspects of human life, specified abstractly enough to resist their identity as a mere psychological instrument, but capable of being translated into testable empirical propositions. Nine possible benchmarks are considered: autonomy, imitation, intrinsic moral value, moral accountability, privacy, reciprocity, conventionality, creativity, and authenticity of relation. Finally, we discuss how getting the right group of benchmarks in human–robot interaction will, in future years, help inform on the foundational question of what constitutes essential features of being human.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 89,378

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Introduction to the Special Issue on Psychological Benchmarks of Human–Robot Interaction.Karl F. MacDorman & Peter H. Kahn - 2007 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 8 (3):359-362.
Problems with using a human-dog interaction model for human-robot interaction?Torbjorn S. Dahl - 2014 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 15 (2):190-194.
There is no 'I' in 'Robot': Robots and Utilitarianism (expanded & revised).Christopher Grau - 2011 - In Susan Anderson & Michael Anderson (eds.), Machine Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 451.
Robot-mediated joint attention in children with autism: A case study in robot-human interaction.Ben Robins, Paul Dickerson, Penny Stribling & Kerstin Dautenhahn - 2004 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 5 (2):161-198.

Analytics

Added to PP
2016-02-04

Downloads
73 (#201,956)

6 months
8 (#153,685)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?