Results for 'privacy'

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  1. The nature and value of the.Moral Right To Privacy - 2002 - Public Affairs Quarterly 16 (4):329.
     
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  2. Chapter outline.A. Myth Versus Reality, D. Publicity not Privacy, E. Guilty Until Proven Innocent, J. Change & Rotation Mentality - forthcoming - Moral Management: Business Ethics.
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  3. Privacy in Public: A Democratic Defense.Titus Stahl - 2020 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 7 (1):73-96.
    Traditional arguments for privacy in public suggest that intentionally public activities, such as political speech, do not deserve privacy protection. In this article, I develop a new argument for the view that surveillance of intentionally public activities should be limited to protect the specific good that this context provides, namely democratic legitimacy. Combining insights from Helen Nissenbaum’s contextualism and Jürgen Habermas’s theory of the public sphere, I argue that strategic surveillance of the public sphere can undermine the capacity (...)
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  4. Data, Privacy, and the Individual.Carissa Véliz - 2020 - Center for the Governance of Change.
    The first few years of the 21st century were characterised by a progressive loss of privacy. Two phenomena converged to give rise to the data economy: the realisation that data trails from users interacting with technology could be used to develop personalised advertising, and a concern for security that led authorities to use such personal data for the purposes of intelligence and policing. In contrast to the early days of the data economy and internet surveillance, the last few years (...)
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  5. Privacy, Autonomy, and Personalised targeting: Rethinking How Personal Data is Used.Karina Vold & Jessica Whittlestone - 2020 - In Carissa Veliz (ed.), Report on Data, Privacy, and the Individual in the Digital Age.
    Technological advances are bringing new light to privacy issues and changing the reasons for why privacy is important. These advances have changed not only the kind of personal data that is available to be collected, but also how that personal data can be used by those who have access to it. We are particularly concerned with how information about personal attributes inferred from collected data (such as online behaviour), can be used to tailor messages and services to specific (...)
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  6. Mental Privacy, Cognitive Liberty, and Hog-tying.Parker Crutchfield - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
    As the science and technology of the brain and mind develop, so do the ways in which brains and minds may be surveilled and manipulated. Some cognitive libertarians worry that these developments undermine cognitive liberty, or “freedom of thought.” I argue that protecting an individual’s cognitive liberty undermines others’ ability to use their own cognitive liberty. Given that the threatening devices and processes are not relevantly different from ordinary and frequent intrusions upon one’s brain and mind, strong protections of cognitive (...)
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  7.  65
    Unpopular Privacy: What Must We Hide?Anita Allen - 2011 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    Can the government stick us with privacy we don't want? It can, it does, and according to this author, may need to do more of it. Privacy is a foundational good, she argues, a necessary tool in the liberty-lover's kit for a successful life. A nation committed to personal freedom must be prepared to mandate inalienable, liberty-promoting privacies for its people, whether they eagerly embrace them or not. The eight chapters of this book are reflections on public regulation (...)
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  8. Privacy, Ethics, and Institutional Research.Alan Rubel - 2019 - New Directions in Institutional Research 2019 (183):5-16.
    Despite widespread agreement that privacy in the context of education is important, it can be difficult to pin down precisely why and to what extent it is important, and it is challenging to determine how privacy is related to other important values. But that task is crucial. Absent a clear sense of what privacy is, it will be difficult to understand the scope of privacy protections in codes of ethics. Moreover, privacy will inevitably conflict with (...)
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  9.  30
    Privacy as Protection of the Incomputable Self: From Agnostic to Agonistic Machine Learning.Mireille Hildebrandt - 2019 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 20 (1):83-121.
    This Article takes the perspective of law and philosophy, integrating insights from computer science. First, I will argue that in the era of big data analytics we need an understanding of privacy that is capable of protecting what is uncountable, incalculable or incomputable about individual persons. To instigate this new dimension of the right to privacy, I expand previous work on the relational nature of privacy, and the productive indeterminacy of human identity it implies, into an ecological (...)
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  10.  26
    Privacy Is Power.Carissa Véliz - 2020 - London, UK: Penguin (Bantam Press).
    Selected by the Economist as one of the best books of 2020. -/- Privacy Is Power argues that people should protect their personal data because privacy is a kind of power. If we give too much of our data to corporations, the wealthy will rule. If we give too much personal data to governments, we risk sliding into authoritarianism. For democracy to be strong, the bulk of power needs to be with the citizenry, and whoever has the data (...)
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  11. Privacy, Democracy and Freedom of Expression.Annabelle Lever - 2014 - In Beaete Roessler & Dorota Mokrosinska (eds.), The Social Dimensions of Privacy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 67-69.
    Must privacy and freedom of expression conflict? To witness recent debates in Britain, you might think so. Anything other than self-regulation by the press is met by howls of anguish from journalists across the political spectrum, to the effect that efforts to protect people’s privacy will threaten press freedom, promote self-censorship and prevent the press from fulfilling its vital function of informing the public and keeping a watchful eye on the activities and antics of the powerful.[Brown, 2009, 13 (...)
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  12.  49
    Disentangling Privacy and Intimacy: Intimate Citizenship, Private Boundaries and Public Transgressions.Paul Reynolds - 2010 - Human Affairs 20 (1):33-42.
    Disentangling Privacy and Intimacy: Intimate Citizenship, Private Boundaries and Public Transgressions Recent theorisations of transformations of intimacy—like Ken Plummer's (2003) Intimate Citizenship project—concentrate on social and cultural transformations that erode the containment of intimacy within the private sphere. They have less to say about the character of and oppositions to that erosion, and specifically how far the idea of the private stands in opposition to intimacy transgressing into the public. In this essay, the private is explored through its constitutive (...)
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  13.  85
    Privacy and ethics in brain-computer interface research.Eran Klein & Alan Rubel - 2018 - In Eran Klein & Alan Rubel (eds.), Brain–Computer Interfaces Handbook: Technological and Theoretical Advances. pp. 653-655.
    Neural engineers and clinicians are starting to translate advances in electrodes, neural computation, and signal processing into clinically useful devices to allow control of wheelchairs, spellers, prostheses, and other devices. In the process, large amounts of brain data are being generated from participants, including intracortical, subdural and extracranial sources. Brain data is a vital resource for BCI research but there are concerns about whether the collection and use of this data generates risk to privacy. Further, the nature of BCI (...)
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  14.  53
    The privacy of the psychical.Amihud Gilead - 2011 - Amsterdam: Rodopi.
    This book argues that the irreducible singularity of each person as a psychical subject implies the privacy of the psychical and that of experience, and yet the private accessibility of each person to his or her mind is compatible with interpersonal communication and understanding. The book treats these major issues against the background of the author's original metaphysics--panenmentalism."--Publisher's website.
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  15.  48
    Privacy and Health Practices in the Digital Age.Monique Pyrrho, Leonardo Cambraia & Viviane Ferreira de Vasconcelos - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (7):50-59.
    Increasing privacy concerns are arising from expanding use of aggregated personal information in health practices. Conversely, in light of the promising benefits of data driven healthcare, privacy...
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  16. Transparency, Privacy and Civil Inattention.Emmanuel Alloa - 2021 - In Cultures of Transparency: Between Promise and Peril. London/New York: pp. 171-191.
    The demand for more transparency is hardly ever questioned. When it is, it is generally questioned in the name of a protection of privacy. In a traditional liberal understanding, there is a non-alienable “right to privacy” (Warren/Brandeis, 1890). Many political struggles, however, involved ignoring such boundaries, and making public things that were meant to remain private (domestic violence, gender oppression, child abuse etc.). While holding that the distinction between private and public is necessary, it must remain mobile and (...)
     
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  17. Privacy, trust and business ethics for mobile business social networks.Hungarian Academy of Sciences Istvan Mezgar & Sonja Grabner-Kräuter Hungary - 2015 - In Daniel E. Palmer (ed.), Handbook of research on business ethics and corporate responsibilities. Hershey: Business Science Reference, An Imprint of IGI Global.
     
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  18. Privacy, Intimacy, and Isolation.Julie C. Inness - 1992 - New York, US: OUP Usa.
    From the Supreme Court to the bedroom, privacy is an intensely contested interest in our everyday lives and privacy law. Some people appeal to privacy to protect such critical areas as abortion, sexuality, and personal information. Yet, privacy skeptics argue that there is no such thing as a right to privacy. I argue that we cannot abandon the concept of privacy. If we wish to avoid extending this elusive concept to cover too much of (...)
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  19.  13
    Privacy and philosophy: new media and affective protocol.Andrew McStay - 2014 - New York: Peter Lang.
    In this book, McStay draws on an array of philosophers to offer a novel approach to privacy matters. Against the backdrop and scrutiny of Arendt, Aristotle, Bentham, Brentano, Deleuze, Engels, Heidegger, Hume, Husserl, James, Kant, Latour, Locke, Marx, Mill, Plato, Rorty, Ryle, Sartre, Skinner, among others, McStay advances a wealth of new ideas and terminology, from affective breaches to zombie media.
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  20.  10
    The right to privacy.Janet E. Smith - 2008 - San Francisco: Ignatius Press.
    Foreword by Robert H. Bork -- Culture wars -- A distorted understanding of rights -- The right to privacy -- Griswold and contraception -- Roe and abortion -- Assisted suicide and homosexuality -- Political connections and natural consequences.
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  21.  28
    Turning Privacy Inside Out.Julie E. Cohen - 2019 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 20 (1):1-31.
    The problem of theorizing privacy moves on two levels, the first consisting of an inadequate conceptual vocabulary and the second consisting of an inadequate institutional grammar. Privacy rights are supposed to protect individual subjects, and so conventional ways of understanding privacy are subject-centered, but subject-centered approaches to theorizing privacy also wrestle with deeply embedded contradictions. And privacy’s most enduring institutional failure modes flow from its insistence on placing the individual and individualized control at the center. (...)
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  22.  5
    Privacy.Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin & Daniel Moore - 2010 - In What is Nanotechnology and why does it Matter? Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 185–214.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Historical and Legal Background Philosophical Foundations Radio Frequency Identity Chips Item‐Level Tagging Human Implants RFID‐Chipped Identification Is RFID a Threat to Privacy?
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  23. Privacy versus Public Health? A Reassessment of Centralised and Decentralised Digital Contact Tracing.Lucie White & Philippe van Basshuysen - 2021 - Science and Engineering Ethics 27 (2):1-13.
    At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, high hopes were placed on digital contact tracing. Digital contact tracing apps can now be downloaded in many countries, but as further waves of COVID-19 tear through much of the northern hemisphere, these apps are playing a less important role in interrupting chains of infection than anticipated. We argue that one of the reasons for this is that most countries have opted for decentralised apps, which cannot provide a means of rapidly informing users (...)
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  24. Group privacy: a defence and an interpretation.Luciano Floridi - 2017 - In Bart van der Sloot, Luciano Floridi & Linnet Taylor (eds.), Group Privacy. Springer Verlag.
    In this chapter I identify three problems affecting the plausibility of group privacy and argue in favour of their resolution. The first problem concerns the nature of the groups in question. I shall argue that groups are neither discovered nor invented, but designed by the level of abstraction (LoA) at which a specific analysis of a social system is developed. Their design is therefore justified insofar as the purpose, guiding the choice of the LoA, is justified. This should remove (...)
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  25.  49
    Privacy in the digital age: comparing and contrasting individual versus social approaches towards privacy.Marcel Becker - 2019 - Ethics and Information Technology 21 (4):307-317.
    This paper takes as a starting point a recent development in privacy-debates: the emphasis on social and institutional environments in the definition and the defence of privacy. Recognizing the merits of this approach I supplement it in two respects. First, an analysis of the relation between privacy and autonomy teaches that in the digital age more than ever individual autonomy is threatened. The striking contrast between on the one hand offline vocabulary, where autonomy and individual decision making (...)
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  26. Between Privacy and Utility: On Differential Privacy in Theory and Practice.Jeremy Seeman & Daniel Susser - 2023 - Acm Journal on Responsible Computing 1 (1):1-18.
    Differential privacy (DP) aims to confer data processing systems with inherent privacy guarantees, offering strong protections for personal data. But DP’s approach to privacy carries with it certain assumptions about how mathematical abstractions will be translated into real-world systems, which—if left unexamined and unrealized in practice—could function to shield data collectors from liability and criticism, rather than substantively protect data subjects from privacy harms. This article investigates these assumptions and discusses their implications for using DP to (...)
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  27.  32
    Understanding Privacy in Occupational Health Services.Anne Heikkinen, Gustav Wickström & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (5):515-530.
    The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of privacy in occupational health services. Data were collected through in-depth theme interviews with occupational health professionals (n=15), employees (n=15) and employers (n=14). Our findings indicate that privacy, in this context, is a complex and multilayered concept, and that companies as well as individual employees have their own core secrets. Co-operation between the three groups proved challenging: occupational health professionals have to consider carefully in which situations and (...)
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  28.  87
    Genetic Privacy: A Challenge to Medico-Legal Norms.Graeme Laurie - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The phenomenon of the New Genetics raises complex social problems, particularly those of privacy. This book offers ethical and legal perspectives on the questions of a right to know and not to know genetic information from the standpoint of individuals, their relatives, employers, insurers and the state. Graeme Laurie provides a unique definition of privacy, including a concept of property rights in the person, and argues for stronger legal protection of privacy in the shadow of developments in (...)
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  29. Privacy.Edmund Byrne - 1998 - In Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 649-659.
    Privacy involves a zone of inaccessibility in a particular context. In social discourse it pertains to activities that are not public, the latter being by definition knowable by outsiders. The public domain so called is the opposite of secrecy and somewhat less so of confidentiality. The private sphere is respected in law and morality, now in terms of a right to privacy. In law some violations of privacy are torts. Philosophers tend to associate privacy with personhood. (...)
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  30. Information Privacy and Social Self-Authorship.Daniel Susser - 2016 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 20 (3):216-239.
    The dominant approach in privacy theory defines information privacy as some form of control over personal information. In this essay, I argue that the control approach is mistaken, but for different reasons than those offered by its other critics. I claim that information privacy involves the drawing of epistemic boundaries—boundaries between what others should and shouldn’t know about us. While controlling what information others have about us is one strategy we use to draw such boundaries, it is (...)
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  31. Privacy. An intercultural perspective.Rafael Capurro - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (1):37-47.
    This paper deals with intercultural aspects of privacy, particularly with regard to differences between Japanese and Western conceptions. It starts with a reconstruction of the genealogy of Western subjectivity and human dignity as the basic assumptions underlying Western views on privacy. An analysis of the Western concept of informational privacy is presented. The Japanese topic of ‘‘denial of self” (Musi) as well as the concepts of Seken, Shakai and Ikai (as analyzed by the authors of the companion (...)
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  32. What to Do When Privacy Is Gone.James Brusseau - 2019 - In Computer Ethics - Philosophical Enquiry (CEPE) Proceedings. pp. 1 - 8.
    Today’s ethics of privacy is largely dedicated to defending personal information from big data technologies. This essay goes in the other direction; it considers the struggle to be lost, and explores two strategies for living after privacy is gone. First, total exposure embraces privacy’s decline, and then contributes to the process with transparency. All personal information is shared without reservation. The resulting ethics is explored through a big data version of Robert Nozick’s Experience Machine thought experiment. Second, (...)
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  33. Bodily Privacy, Toilets, and Sex Discrimination: The Problem of "Manhood" in a Women's Prison.Jami L. Anderson - 2009 - In Olga Gershenson Barbara Penner (ed.), Ladies and Gents. pp. 90.
    Unjustifiable assumptions about sex and gender roles, the untamable potency of maleness, and gynophobic notions about women's bodies inform and influence a broad range of policy-making institutions in this society. In December 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit continued this ignoble cultural pastime when they decided Everson v. Michigan Department of Corrections. In this decision, the Everson Court accepted the Michigan Department of Correction's claim that “the very manhood” of male prison guards both threatens the safety (...)
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  34.  35
    Privacy Rights Forfeiture.Mark Hanin - 2022 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 22 (2).
    Privacy rights can surely be waived. But can they also be forfeited? If so, why and under what conditions? This article takes up these questions by developing a novel theory of privacy rights forfeiture that draws inspiration from Judith Thomson’s canonical work on privacy. The paper identifies two species of forfeiture rooted in modes of negligent and reckless conduct and argues that both self-directed and other-regarding considerations play a role in grounding forfeiture. The paper also contributes to (...)
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  35.  68
    Why Privacy Isn't Everything: Feminist Reflections on Personal Accountability.Anita L. Allen - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Accountability protects public health and safety, facilitates law enforcement, and enhances national security, but it is much more than a bureaucratic concern for corporations, public administrators, and the criminal justice system. In Why Privacy Isn't Everything, Anita L. Allen provides a highly original treatment of neglected issues affecting the intimacies of everyday life, and freshly examines how a preeminent liberal society accommodates the competing demands of vital privacy and vital accountability for personal matters. Thus, "None of your business!" (...)
  36. Privacy and Punishment.Mark Tunick - 2013 - Social Theory and Practice 39 (4):643-668.
    Philosophers have focused on why privacy is of value to innocent people with nothing to hide. I argue that for people who do have something to hide, such as a past crime, or bad behavior in a public place, informational privacy can be important for avoiding undeserved or disproportionate non-legal punishment. Against the objection that one cannot expect privacy in public facts, I argue that I might have a legitimate privacy interest in public facts that are (...)
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  37. Three Control Views on Privacy.Leonhard Menges - 2022 - Social Theory and Practice 48 (4):691-711.
    This paper discusses the idea that the concept of privacy should be understood in terms of control. Three different attempts to spell out this idea will be critically discussed. The conclusion will be that the Source Control View on privacy is the most promising version of the idea that privacy is to be understood in terms of control.
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  38.  8
    Privacy.Anita Allen - 1998 - In Alison M. Jaggar & Iris Marion Young (eds.), A companion to feminist philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell. pp. 456–465.
    If feminism has taken a stance toward privacy, the stance is ambivalence. Conceptions of privacy have been central to many critiques of what feminists term the “liberal” and “patriarchical” dimensions of Western societies. Just how privacy has been central to feminism is a worthwhile subject of inquiry. Interestingly, conceptions of privacy have functioned within feminist thought both as targets and as tools of critique. Some feminists target privacy for condemnation as a barrier to female liberation, (...)
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  39. Transparency, privacy commons and civil inattention.Emmanuel Alloa - 2021 - In Cultures of Transparency: Between Promise and Peril. London/New York: pp. 171-192.
  40. Privacy Rights and Public Information.Benedict Rumbold & James Wilson - 2018 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (1):3-25.
    This article concerns the nature and limits of individuals’ rights to privacy over information that they have made public. For some, even suggesting that an individual can have a right to privacy over such information may seem paradoxical. First, one has no right to privacy over information that was never private to begin with. Second, insofar as one makes once-private information public – whether intentionally or unintentionally – one waives one’s right to privacy to that information. (...)
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  41. Privacy and perfect voyeurism.Tony Doyle - 2009 - Ethics and Information Technology 11 (3):181-189.
    I argue that there is nothing wrong with perfect voyeurism , covert watching or listening that is neither discovered nor publicized. After a brief discussion of privacy I present attempts from Stanley Benn, Daniel Nathan, and James Moor to show that the act is wrong. I argue that these authors fail to make their case. However, I maintain that, if detected or publicized, voyeurism can do grave harm and to that extent should be severely punished. I conclude with some (...)
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  42.  58
    Group privacy.Bart van der Sloot, Luciano Floridi & Linnet Taylor (eds.) - 2016 - Springer Verlag.
    The goal of the book is to present the latest research on the new challenges of data technologies. It will offer an overview of the social, ethical and legal problems posed by group profiling, big data and predictive analysis and of the different approaches and methods that can be used to address them. In doing so, it will help the reader to gain a better grasp of the ethical and legal conundrums posed by group profiling. The volume first maps the (...)
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  43. Why privacy is important.James Rachels - 1975 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 4 (4):323-333.
  44.  84
    Privacy.Judith DeCew - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  45.  40
    Privacy and the Standing to Hold Responsible.Linda Radzik - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Philosophy:1-22.
    In order to be held responsible, it is not enough that you’ve done something blameworthy, someone else must also have the standing to hold you responsible. But a number of critics have claimed that this concept of ‘standing’ doesn’t hold up to scrutiny and that we should excise it from our analyses of accountability practices. In this paper, I examine James Edwards’ (2019) attempt to define standing. I pose objections to some key features of Edwards’ account and defend an alternative. (...)
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  46.  80
    Privacy and data privacy issues in contemporary china.Lü Yao-Huai - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (1):7-15.
    Recent anthropological analyses of Chinese attitudes towards privacy fail to pay adequate attention to more ordinary, but more widely shared ideas of privacy – ideas that, moreover, have changed dramatically since the 1980s as China has become more and more open to Western countries, cultures, and their network and computing technologies. I begin by reviewing these changes, in part to show how contemporary notions of privacy in China constitute a dialectical synthesis of both traditional Chinese emphases on (...)
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  47. Information Privacy for Technology Users With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Why Does It Matter?Maxine Perrin, Rawad Mcheimech, Johanna Lake, Yves Lachapelle, Jeffrey W. Jutai, Amélie Gauthier-Beaupré, Crislee Dignard, Virginie Cobigo & Hajer Chalghoumi - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):201-217.
    This article aims to explore the attitudes and behaviors of persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities related to their information privacy when using information technology. Six persons with IDD were recruited to participate to a series of 3 semistructured focus groups. Data were analyzed following a hybrid thematic analysis approach. Only 2 participants reported using IT every day. However, they all perceived IT use benefits, such as an increased autonomy. Participants demonstrated awareness of privacy concerns, but not in (...)
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  48.  37
    Privacy, Health, and Race Equity in the Digital Age.Anita L. Allen - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (7):60-63.
    Privacy is a basic and foundational human good meriting moral and legal protection. Privacy isn’t, however, everything. Other goods and values matter, too (Solove 2003; Ma...
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  49. Privacy at work – ethical criteria.Anders J. Persson & Sven Ove Hansson - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (1):59 - 70.
    New technologies and practices, such as drug testing, genetic testing, and electronic surveillance infringe upon the privacy of workers on workplaces. We argue that employees have a prima facie right to privacy, but this right can be overridden by competing moral principles that follow, explicitly or implicitly, from the contract of employment. We propose a set of criteria for when intrusions into an employee''s privacy are justified. Three types of justification are specified, namely those that refer to (...)
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  50.  25
    Workplace Privacy: Different Views and Arising Issues.Tomas Bagdanskis & Paulius Sartatavičius - 2012 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 19 (2):697-713.
    This article discusses the problematic aspects relating to the employee privacy in his workplace and its limits reacting to employer‘s interests. It contains analysis of National, European and transatlantic legislation of privacy in the workplace and concentrates on the electronic privacy (e-mails, communications, etc.). The article is based on legal acts and judgements of the Supreme court of Lithuania, European Court of Human Rights and other countries courts judgements in order to provide the legislative execution practice as (...)
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