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Paul Dumouchel [78]Paul Gerard Dumouchel [1]
  1.  39
    Living with Robots.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - Harvard University Press.
    "Cover " -- "Title Page " -- "Copyright " -- "Contents " -- "Preface to the English Edition" -- "Introduction" -- "1. The Substitute" -- "2. Animals, Machines, Cyborgs, and the Taxi " -- "3. Mind, Emotions, and Artificial Empathy " -- "4. The Other Otherwise " -- "5. From Moral and Lethal Machines to Synthetic Ethics " -- "Notes" -- "Works Cited" -- "Acknowledgments" -- "Credits.
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  2.  85
    Anthropomorphism in Human–Robot Co-evolution.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:468.
    Social robotics entertains a particular relationship with anthropomorphism, which it neither sees as a cognitive error, nor as a sign of immaturity. Rather it considers that this common human tendency, which is hypothesized to have evolved because it favored cooperation among early humans, can be used today to facilitate social interactions between humans and a new type of cooperative and interactive agents - social robots. This approach leads social robotics to focus research on the engineering of robots that activate anthropomorphic (...)
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  3.  36
    Emotions in Relation. Epistemological and Ethical Scaffolding for Mixed Human-Robot Social Ecologies.Luisa Damiano & Paul Gerard Dumouchel - 2020 - Humana Mente 13 (37).
    In this article we tackle the core question of machine emotion research – “Can machines have emotions?” – in the context of “social robots”, a new class of machines designed to function as “social partners” for humans. Our aim, however, is not to provide an answer to the question “Can robots have emotions?” Rather we argue that the “robotics of emotion” moves us to reformulate it into a different one – “Can robots affectively coordinate with humans?” Developing a series of (...)
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  4.  38
    Making Faces.Paul Dumouchel - 2022 - Topoi 41 (4):631-639.
    I argue in this paper that the claimed universal recognition of basic emotions corresponds to the recognition of conventionalized representations of emotions common in our culture. Section one presents some of the faces that people make in different circumstances, and argues that making faces is a form of action. Faces made function as narrative tools and as conversational tools. Section two compares and contrasts two conceptions of facial displays: basic emotion theories and the behavioral ecology view. The next section analyzes (...)
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  5.  6
    The Ambivalence of Scarcity and Other Essays.Paul Dumouchel - 2014 - Michigan State University Press.
    First published in French in 1979, “The Ambivalence of Scarcity” was a groundbreaking work on mimetic theory. Now expanded upon with new, specially written, and never-before-published conference texts and essays, this revised edition explores René Girard’s philosophy in three sections: economy and economics, mimetic theory, and violence and politics in modern societies. The first section argues that though mimetic theory is in many ways critical of modern economic theory, this criticism can contribute to the enrichment of economic thinking. The second (...)
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  6.  80
    Violence and truth: on the work of René Girard.Paul Dumouchel (ed.) - 1988 - Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.
    Introduction My claims are scandalously out of proportion with the general temper of the times and my literary background, which must be regarded by almost ...
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  7.  13
    Contents.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press.
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  8.  25
    Enlightenment to Enlightenment: Intercritique of Science and Myth.Paul Dumouchel, Henri Atlan & Lenn J. Shramm - 1995 - Substance 24 (1/2):181.
  9. René Girard and Philosophy: An Interview with Paul Dumouchel.Paul Dumouchel & Andreas Wilmes - 2017 - Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence 1 (1):2-11.
    What was René Girard’s attitude towards philosophy? What philosophers influenced him? What stance did he take in the philosophical debates of his time? What are the philosophical questions raised by René Girard’s anthropology? In this interview, Paul Dumouchel sheds light on these issues.
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  10.  69
    Gilbert simondon's plea for a philosophy of technology.Paul Dumouchel - 1992 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 35 (3-4):407 – 421.
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  11.  12
    5. From Moral and Lethal Machines to Synthetic Ethics.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 170-206.
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  12.  14
    Emotions in (Human-Robot) Relation. Structuring Hybrid Social Ecologies.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2023 - In Catrin Misselhorn, Tom Poljanšek, Tobias Störzinger & Maike Klein (eds.), Emotional Machines: Perspectives from Affective Computing and Emotional Human-Machine Interaction. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. pp. 61-82.
    This essay tackles the core question of machine emotion research—“Can machines have emotions?”—with regard to “social robots”, the new class of machines designed to function as “social partners” for humans. Our aim, however, is not to provide an answer to that question. Rather we argue that “robotics of emotion” moves us to ask a different question—“Can robots establish meaningful affective coordination with human partners?” Developing a series of arguments relevant to theory of emotion, philosophy of AI and the epistemology of (...)
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  13.  8
    Emotions and Rationality.Paul Dumouchel - 2023 - In Nathalie Bulle & Francesco Di Iorio (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Methodological Individualism: Volume I. Springer Verlag. pp. 141-160.
    The starting point of my inquiry is the important uncertainty in relevant scientific communities concerning the nature of emotions. In consequence, in this chapter I look at three conceptions of emotions and their different relations to reasons. First, following Elster (2000) emotions as passions that are contrary to reason. Second, in line with recent developments in psychology that have had great success in economics and decisions theory, emotions as rational, as consonant with reason and indispensable to rational decision taking. As (...)
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  14.  27
    Reciprocity: Nuclear Risk and Responsibility.Paul Dumouchel - 2015 - ProtoSociology 32:166-183.
    Focusing on the March 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident, this article argues that there is or can be a form of reciprocity between the victims of a catastrophe and society at large to the extent that victims become the occasion and rationale for social reforms. The victims’ contribution to society in this case is the simple fact of being victims. Such a form of reciprocity requires a particular relation to time which Jean-Pierre Dupuy has recently analyzed. In the case of modern (...)
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  15. Naturalizing Ethics: A Girardian Perspective.Paul Dumouchel - 2013 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 20:77-86.
    As the vulgar generally look no higher for the original of moral good and evil, just and unjust, than the codes and pandects, the tables and laws of their country and religion, so there have not wanted pretended philosophers in all ages who have asserted nothing to be good and evil, just and unjust, naturally and immutably; but that these things were positive, arbitrary and factitious only.1 In this short presentation I want to propose a sketch of what “naturalizing ethics (...)
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  16.  8
    Ijime.Paul Dumouchel - 1999 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 6 (1):77-84.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:IJIME Paul Dumouchel Université du Québec à Montréal In Japan, in particular in junior and senior high school, there is a violent phenomenon known in Japanese as ijime, a term which could be translated as bullying. While the word may be culturally marked, the phenomenon it describes is certainly universal. Bullying is a process through which a child becomes the victim of one or more of his classmates. A (...)
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  17.  18
    Girard et le politique.Paul Dumouchel - 2013 - Cités 53 (1):17.
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  18.  8
    Acknowledgments.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 251-252.
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  19.  18
    2. Animals, Machines, Cyborgs, and the Taxi.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 58-88.
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  20.  11
    Credits.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 253-254.
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  21.  17
    Frontmatter.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press.
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  22.  16
    Introduction.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 1-23.
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  23.  8
    Index.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 255-262.
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  24.  25
    3. Mind, Emotions, and Artificial Empathy.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 89-137.
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  25.  12
    Notes.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 207-234.
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  26.  11
    Preface to the English Edition.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press.
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  27.  9
    4. The Other Otherwise.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 138-169.
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  28.  16
    1. The Substitute.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 24-57.
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  29.  35
    Vivere con i robot: una conversazione sulla robotica sociale.Luisa Damiano, Paul Dumouchel, Luca Lo Sapio & Delio Salottolo - 2019 - Scientia et Fides 22:137-152.
    Living with the Robots. A Conversation about social Robotics This interview aims at focusing some aspects of an intriguing discipline known as social Robotics. In particular, we try to get familiar with concepts and philosophical frameworks which deal with this new human enterprise. Paul Dumouchel and Luisa Damiano will help us to get in contact with a scenario in which emotions, reason and ethics will be partially revised by a somehow different perspective about human-robot interaction and sociality.
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  30.  13
    Works Cited.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2017 - In Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Living with Robots. Harvard University Press. pp. 235-250.
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  31.  11
    After-Truth.Paul Dumouchel - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):1-13.
    Human beings, after all, provide for each other the most ingenious obstacles to what partial knowledge and minimal rationality they can hope to command.We tend to have a romantic view of liars, or rather of those who lie, and of how and of why they and we lie. A romantic view in the sense in which Girard uses that term in Deceit, Desire, and the Novel, whose French title was Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque, that is, "Romantic lie and novelistic (...)
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  32. Bertrand Binoche, Les trois sources de la philosophie Reviewed by.Paul Dumouchel - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18 (2):83-85.
     
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  33.  54
    Biological modules and emotions.Paul Dumouchel - 2008 - In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The modularity of emotions. Calgary, Alta., Canada: University of Calgary Press. pp. 115-134.
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  34.  12
    Biological Modules and Emotions.Paul Dumouchel - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (sup1):115-134.
    But as for most genes, they are not the units of interest once we get to the network level: it is the whole conspiracy we care about. Biologists, more precisely evolutionary biologists, and not only psychologists and philosophers also speak of modularity. However the way in which this theoretical construct functions in their discipline is relatively different from the role it obtains in evolutionary psychology and cognitive science. Rather than postulating modules to explain particular traits of organisms, such as the (...)
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  35.  33
    Ce que l'on peut apprendre sur les chauves-souris à l'aide d'une télé couleur.Paul Dumouchel - 1993 - Dialogue 32 (3):493-.
    Deux ou trois articles récents, Nagel, Block, Jackson, forment la toile de fond de discussions actuelles au sujet des qualia et du caractère subjectif de l'expérience, du moins en philosophie de l'esprit. Ces articles ont ceci en commun qu'ils visent tous à montrer qu'un certain aspect de l'expérience consciente – les qualia ou sa dimension subjective – remet en cause l'une ou l'autre, ou l'ensemble de nos théories psychophysiques. Ce qui est visé, au-delà des théories psychophysiques, c'est le physicalisme, entendu (...)
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  36.  7
    De la méconnaissance.Paul Dumouchel - 2011 - Lebenswelt: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Experience 1:97-111.
    I argue that the conception of «méconnaissance» put forward by René Girard should be understood in relation to what Popper calls objective knowledge rather than to the classical idea of knowledge as true and justified belief. Objective knowledge considers knowledge as a tool which is open to many uses and abuses. It allows us to make sense of Girard’s claim that «méconnaissance» grows as our knowledge increases and shows that knowledge and «méconnaissance» should not be understood as polar opposites. This (...)
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  37.  11
    Desiring Machines: Machines That Are Desired and Machines That Desire.Paul Dumouchel - 2021 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 28 (1):99-110.
    What is a machine? What distinguishes a machine from a tool or a simple instrument—for example, a knife, a hammer, an ax, or a pencil? Tools are technical objects that can be seen as extending or continuing a bodily action. They augment its efficiency. To push, hit, tear, pierce, crush, grasp, or throw: tools and simple instruments allow us to do better what, to some extent, we can already do without them. They enhance our performance, make the action easier, more (...)
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  38.  52
    Résumé de Évolution et rationalité.Paul Dumouchel - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (1):151-154.
  39.  20
    Résumé de Évolution et rationalité.Paul Dumouchel - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (1):151-154.
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  40. Du traitement moral : Pinel disciple de Condillac.Paul Dumouchel - 1993 - Corpus: Revue de philosophie 22:181-197.
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  41.  18
    Embodiment: The Ecology of Mind.Paul Dumouchel - 2019 - Philosophies 4 (2):12.
    Following a suggestion from G. Bateson, this article enquires into the consequence of the idea of embodiment in philosophy of mind, taking seriously the notion of an ecology of mind. In the first half of this article, after distinguishing between the biological and the systemic approaches to ecology, I focus on three characteristics of the systemic approach. First, that a system is an abstract object that is multiply embodied in a collection of physically distinct heterogeneous objects. Second, that there is (...)
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  42.  8
    François Duchesneau, Philosophie de la biologie.Paul Dumouchel - 1999 - Philosophiques 26 (1):149-154.
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  43. Film. Mirrors of nature: artificial agents in real life and virtual worlds.Paul Dumouchel - 2015 - In Scott Cowdell, Chris Fleming & Joel Hodge (eds.), Mimesis, movies, and media. London: Bloomsbury Academic.
     
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  44.  11
    Good Tricks and Forced Moves, or the Antinomy of Natural Reason.'.Paul Dumouchel - 2000 - In Don Ross, Andrew Brook & David Thompson (eds.), Dennett’s Philosophy: A Comprehensive Assessment. MIT Press. pp. 41--54.
  45.  48
    Hobbes, Contractarians and Scepticism.Paul Dumouchel - 2002 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 58 (2):333 - 345.
    Starting from an historical remark of R. Tuch (1993) concerning the relationship between Renaissance scepticism and the first social contract theories, this article defends the idea that the main difference between Hobbes's social contract theory and contemporary contractualism rests on the conception of reason. Comparing Hobbes and Rawls it shows that the first one rejects subjective theories of rationality and conceives the contract as a pre-condition of successfid individual rationality, which allows him both to escape sceptical and relativist criticisms and (...)
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  46.  57
    Hobbes & Secularization: Christianity and the Political Problem of Religion.Paul Dumouchel - 1995 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 2 (1):39-56.
  47.  37
    Intelligence, Artificial and Otherwise.Paul Dumouchel - 2019 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 24 (2):241-258.
    The idea of artificial intelligence implies the existence of a form of intelligence that is “natural,” or at least not artificial. The problem is that intelligence, whether “natural” or “artificial,” is not well defined: it is hard to say what, exactly, is or constitutes intelligence. This difficulty makes it impossible to measure human intelligence against artificial intelligence on a unique scale. It does not, however, prevent us from comparing them; rather, it changes the sense and meaning of such comparisons. Comparing (...)
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  48.  26
    Indifference and Envy: The Anthropological Analysis of Modern Economy.Paul Dumouchel - 2003 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 10 (1):149-160.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:INDIFFERENCE AND ENVY: THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF MODERN ECONOMY Paul Dumouchel University ofQuébec-Montréal 1. Girard and economics René Girard himself has not written very much on economics, at least explicitly. Though his works are full ofinsights into and short remarks on the sacrificial origin of different economic phenomena or the way in which mimetic relations and commercial transactions are often intertwined and act upon each other.1 Unlike religion, psychology, (...)
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  49.  48
    Inside Out: Political Violence in the Age of Globalization.Paul Dumouchel - 2008 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 15:173-184.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Inside OutPolitical Violence in the Age of GlobalizationPaul Dumouchel (bio)One characteristic of globalization that often goes unnoticed, perhaps because it is so evident, is that it has no outside. There is nowhere beyond, no place that can be viewed as an outer space, as a location that globalization has not reached. Globalization has no border that indicates that this is where it ends; rather it closes upon itself like (...)
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  50. L'Auto-organisation, de la physique au politique, Colloque de Cerisy.Paul Dumouchel & Jean-Pierre Dupuy - 1985 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 90 (4):559-559.
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