Asian Philosophy 14 (2):171 – 190 (2004)

Abstract
The most constructive response to the crisis in moral theory has been the revival of virtue ethics, an ethics that has the advantages of being personal, contextual, and, as this paper will argue, normative as well. The first section offers a general comparative analysis of Confucian and Whiteheadian philosophies, showing their common process orientation and their views of a somatic self united in reason and passion. The second section contrasts rational with aesthetic order, demonstrating a parallel with analytic and synthetic reason, and showing that rule-based ethics comes under the former and virtue ethics under the latter. The third and final section discusses a Confucian-Whiteheadian aesthetics of virtue, focusing on love as the comprehensive virtue. The principal goal of the paper is to propose that an appropriation of Confucian virtue ethics will enhance the otherwise slow development of a Euro-American process ethics.
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DOI 10.1080/0955236042000237408
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References found in this work BETA

Art as Experience.John Dewey - 1934 - G. Allen & Unwin.
A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy.Wing-Tsit Chan - 1963 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
From Morality to Virtue.Michael Slote - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
Thinking Through Confucius.David L. Hall & Roger T. Ames - 1987 - Philosophy East and West 41 (2):241-254.

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Citations of this work BETA

On the “Virtue Turn” and the Problem of Categorizing Chinese Thought.Eric L. Hutton - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):331-353.

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