Order:
  1.  11
    What Follows From the Problem of Ignorance?Zeynep Pamuk - 2020 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 32 (1-3):182-191.
    ABSTRACT In Power Without Knowledge, Jeffrey Friedman develops a critique of social science to argue that current technocratic practices are prone to predictive failures and unintended consequences. However, he does not provide evidence that the cause he singles out—“ideational heterogeneity”—is in fact a non-negligible source of technocratic limitations, more than or alongside better-known problems such as missing data, measurement issues, interpretive difficulties, and researcher bias. Even if we grant ideational heterogeneity, Friedman’s preferred institutional solution of exitocracy does not necessarily follow. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  31
    Beyond populism and technocracy: The challenges and limits of democratic epistemology.Alfred Moore, Carlo Invernizzi-Accetti, Elizabeth Markovits, Zeynep Pamuk & Sophia Rosenfeld - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (4):730-752.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  20
    Risk and Fear: Restricting Science Under Uncertainty.Zeynep Pamuk - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (3):444-460.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  2
    The Promises and Perils of Predictive Politics.Zeynep Pamuk - forthcoming - European Journal of Political Theory:147488512210856.
    Rachel Friedman’s Probable Justice and Jeffrey Friedman’s Power without Knowledge explore the promises and pitfalls of the application of predictive tools to the solution of social and political pr...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Promises and Perils of Predictive Politics.Zeynep Pamuk - forthcoming - Sage Publications: European Journal of Political Theory.
    European Journal of Political Theory, Ahead of Print. Rachel Friedman’s Probable Justice and Jeffrey Friedman’s Power without Knowledge explore the promises and pitfalls of the application of predictive tools to the solution of social and political problems. Rachel Friedman argues that a fundamental duality in philosophical interpretations of probability allowed social insurance schemes to successfully accommodate two rival visions of liberal justice over the centuries. But in focusing on ideas around probability, she misses the limitations of the experts who put (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark