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  1. Scientific Authority: Consensually Agreed Knowledge of Nature.Victor Bien - 2012 - The Australian Humanist (106):16.
    Bien, Victor This article addresses the importance of science to Humanists, as expressed in an object of the Humanist Society of NSW, namely 'to promote the fullest use of science for human welfare'. Similarly, Humanist support for science is expressed in the Amsterdam Declaration endorsed by the 50th Congress of the International Humanist and Ethical Union in 2002. Paragraph 2 reads: Humanism is rational. It seeks to use science creatively, not destructively. Humanists believe that the solutions to the world's problems (...)
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  2. Brief Reflections on Some Enlightenment Figures.Victor Bien - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 112:13.
    Bien, Victor As a technically orientated person and educated in a scientific field, namely physical chemistry for a higher degree, I have never found history interesting until recent times. This followed from getting to know, with increasing detail, what happened in the Age of Enlightenment. Now I have acquired a strong taste for history!
     
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  3. A More Creative Way to Handle Asylum Seekers?Victor Bien - 2014 - Australian Humanist, The 114:8.
    Bien, Victor This article is in sympathy with our CAHS AGM resolutions appealing to the Federal government to uphold Australia's United Nations human rights obligation, but is not addressing that aspect of the asylum seekers issue. Rather it looks at some practical ideas on how we, as a nation, might better handle the political and practical issues which have been given as reasons why our governments feel compelled to refuse to meet our UN human rights obligation. This argues for a (...)
     
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  4. Using the Idea of 'Limits to Growth' to Interpret Present Day Economic Life.Victor Bien - forthcoming - Australian Humanist, The 123:15.
    Bien, Victor Readers here will be familiar with the book 'Limits to Growth' by the Club of Rome in the 1970s. As we know it was written in the same spirit as Thomas Malthus's 'Principle of Population'. Malthus's central thesis warned of the dire consequences of population growth outstripping the supply of food and other resources. This prediction never happened because Malthus had failed to take account of advances in technology. Similarly the dire forecasts by the Club of Rome that (...)
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  5. Making Explicit the Relationship of Humanism to the Enlightenment.Victor Bien - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 111 (111):10.
    Bien, Victor At the 2013 Council of Australian Humanist Societies AGM, held in Sydney on 4 May, it was resolved to adopt 'the defence and promotion of the values of the Enlightenment as an ongoing process for organising our aim, objects and programs.'.
     
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  6. World Humanist Day: A Symposium Addressing the Enlightenment Roots of Humanism.Victor Bien - 2014 - Australian Humanist, The 115:7.
    Bien, Victor This article gives my views as a co-convenor of the Symposium held on 20 June in the NSW Parliament House. My colleague Dr Affie Adagio was the other convenor. Our use of the House was sponsored by Alex Greenwich, member for Sydney.
     
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