9 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Stephen M. Wheeler [6]Stephen Wheeler [5]Stephen Michael Wheeler [1]
  1.  43
    Nothing to Do With Caesar? R. Granobs: Studien Zur Darstellung Römischer Geschichte in Ovids 'Metamorphosen' . Pp. 174. Frankfurt Am Main, Etc.: Peter Lang, 1997. ISBN: 3-631-31953-. [REVIEW]Stephen M. Wheeler - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (1):62-64.
  2.  20
    SNAKEBITTEN C. R. Raschle: Pestes Harenae. Die Schlangenepisode in Lucans Pharsalia ( IX 587–949 ). Pp. 445. Frankfurt Am Main, Etc.: Peter Lang, 2001. Paper, £40. ISBN: 3-631-36666-. [REVIEW]Stephen Wheeler - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (01):104-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  27
    Nomen Omen (J.) Booth, (R.) Maltby (Edd.) What's in a Name? The Significance of Proper Names in Classical Latin Literature. Pp. X + 196, Ills. Swansea: The Classical Press of Wales, 2006. Cased, £45. ISBN: 978-1-905125-09-. [REVIEW]Stephen Wheeler - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (2):455-.
  4.  8
    The Image of the Poet in Ovid's Metamorphoses (Review).Stephen Wheeler - 2010 - American Journal of Philology 131 (1):158-162.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  8
    Ovid's Metamorphoses. Books 1-5.Stephen Michael Wheeler - 1999 - American Journal of Philology 120 (1):170-173.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Imago Mundi: Another View of the Creation in Ovid's Metamorphoses.Stephen M. Wheeler - 1995 - American Journal of Philology 116 (1):95-121.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  7
    Lost Voices: Vergil, Aeneid 12.718–19.Stephen M. Wheeler - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (02):451-.
    Here, in the middle of the well-known simile that depicts Aeneas and Turnus as bulls fighting for territory and a herd , Vergil registers the reactions of the onlookers. Commentators and lexicographers disagree about what the heifers are doing, interpreting ‘mussant’ in different ways. Servius glosses the verb as ‘dubitant’. By contrast, Heyne offers the paraphrase ‘anxii expectant’, responding to the theme of fear in the two preceding cola: cf. ‘pavidi’ and ‘metu’. Forbiger's explanatory ‘tacite expectant’ stresses rather the note (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  9
    Ovid's Use of Lucretius in Metamorphoses 1.67–8.Stephen M. Wheeler - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (01):200-.
    Here Ovid treats the demiurge's disposition of weightless aether over the other elements. This section of the cosmogony follows one that is devoted to the sphere of aer where the creator settles the turbulent winds and other threatening meteorological phenomena. Recently Denis Feeney has suggested that Ovid's demiurge ‘does not act in a very epic manner’ by placing weightless aether on top of the winds. He argues: ‘The oddness of the control is caught in a moment of comparison with Vergil's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  30
    A BODY TO REMEMBER. M.T. Dinter Anatomizing Civil War. Studies in Lucan's Epic Technique. Pp. X + 186. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2012. Cased, US$65. ISBN: 978-0-472-11850-2. [REVIEW]Stephen Wheeler - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):134-136.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark