Order:
  1.  11
    History in the Abstract: ‘Brahman-Ness’ and the Discipline of Nyāya in Seventeenth-Century Vārāṇasī.Samuel Wright - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (5):1041-1069.
    Over the last fifteen years, studies on Sanskrit intellectual history between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries have produced a body of scholarship that has fundamentally reshaped our understanding of the period. Yet, despite significant advances in the understanding of the social-historical circumstances of authors and disciplines as well as success in elucidating major features of intellectual thought, a main point of difficultly has been in combining both the intellectuality and sociality of Sanskrit scholars. By examining a debate within the discipline (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  8
    Framing a 'Climate Change Frontier': International News Media Coverage Surrounding Natural Resource Development in Greenland.William Davies, Samuel Wright & James Van Alstine - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (4):481-502.
    News media helps shape the discourse around natural resource issues, especially rapidly emerging developments such as those taking place in the Arctic. Whilst the relationship between media and audience is complex, news media contributes towards setting the tone and expectations for the burgeoning number of stakeholders engaging with the Arctic, especially in the case of Greenland. This study undertakes a thematic analysis of English-language news media coverage surrounding natural resource development in Greenland to explore how the issue is framed. Five (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  5
    Scholar Networks and the Manuscript Economy in Nyāya-Śāstra in Early Colonial Bengal.Samuel Wright - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (2):323-359.
    This essay engages with two large themes in order to address the social and intellectual practices of nyāya scholars in early colonial Bengal. First, I examine networks that connected scholars with each other and, to a lesser extent, students and households. Exemplified in historical documents of the period, these networks demonstrate that nyāya scholars were part of larger scholar communities in Bengal and across India during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. I map these networks and examine their relevance for how (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark