8 found
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  1.  16
    Bioethics at the Crossroad.Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy - 2001 - Health Care Analysis 9 (4):463-476.
    Bioethics and its offspring Health-care Ethics have a variety ofuses and obligations among which and perhaps most importantly istheir social obligation. This paper raises questions as toBioethics fulfilling the necessary criteria for a profession,suggests that it can serve as a link between individual andcommunal problems, discusses the task of health-care ethics as well as ways of teaching it, lists some of the obligationsof health-care ethics professionals and discusses the dangers to and failings of these health-care professionals today. Itconcludes that we (...)
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  2.  7
    Use and Abuse of Bioethics: Integrity and Professional Standing.Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy - 2005 - Health Care Analysis 13 (1):73-86.
    This paper sets out to examine the integrity and professional standing of “Bioethics.” It argues that professions have certain responsibilities that start with setting criteria for and credentialing those that have met the criteria and goes on to ultimately have social responsibilities to the community. As it now stands we claim that Bioethics—while it certainly has achieved some progress in the way medicine has developed—has failed to become a profession and has to a large extent failed in its social responsibility. (...)
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  3.  12
    Framing Issues in Health Care: Do American Ideals Demand Basic Health Care and Other Social Necessities for All?Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (4):261-271.
    This paper argues for the necessity of universal health care (as well as universal free education) using a different argument than most that have been made heretofore. It is not meant to conflict with but to strengthen the arguments previously made by others. Using the second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence and the Preamble to the Constitution we argue that universal health care in this day and age has become a necessary condition if the ideals of life, liberty and (...)
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  4.  18
    The United States Bishops' Committee Statement on Nutrition and Hydration Commentary.Laurence J. O'Connell, Ronald E. Cranford, T. Patrick Hill & Roberta Springer Loewy - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (3):341.
  5.  17
    Teamwork.Roberta Springer Loewy - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (3):381.
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  6.  9
    Ageisms.Roberta Springer Loewy - 2005 - Health Care Analysis 13 (2):147-156.
    In this paper some very fundamental attitudes we have and assumptions we make in the US about persons, what they owe and what they are owed, are scrutinized and found to be indefensibly ageist. It is argued that these assumptions and the attitudes they engender are supported by logically and ethically suspect methods and conclusions. These errors are summarized and some remedial steps by which we might better protect against such illicit and unwarranted methods and conclusions in the future are (...)
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  7.  14
    Of Cultural Practices, Ethics and Education: Thoughts About Affecting Changes in Cultural Practices. [REVIEW]Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (1):45-51.
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  8.  11
    Lebensunwertes Leben and the Obligation to Die: Does the Obligation to Die Rest on a Misunderstanding of Community? [REVIEW]Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy - 1999 - Health Care Analysis 7 (1):23-36.
    In this paper the authors address the recent argument that we have an obligation to seek or actively bring about our own death when we burden others too greatly. Some of the problems with this argument and some of the practical conseqeuences of adopting such a point of view are discussed in this paper. We argue that the argument rests on an individualistic approach which sees the family being burdened as standing alone instead of seeing it as embedded in a (...)
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