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Ömer Orhan Aygün [3]Omer Aygun [2]
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Ömer Aygün
Galatasaray University
  1.  17
    The Middle Included - Logos in Aristotle.Omer Aygun - 2016 - Evanston, Illinois, Amerika Birleşik Devletleri: Northwestern University Press.
    The Middle Included is a systematic exploration of the meanings of logos throughout Aristotle’s work. It claims that the basic meaning is “gathering,” a relation that holds its terms together without isolating them or collapsing one to the other. This meaning also applies to logos in the sense of human language. Aristotle describes how some animals are capable of understanding non-firsthand experience without being able to relay it, while others relay it without understanding. Aygün argues that what distinguishes human language, (...)
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  2.  59
    On Bees and Humans: Phenomenological Explorations of Hearing Sounds, Voices, and Speech in Aristotle.Ömer Orhan Aygün - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):337-350.
    This paper proposes a solution to the apparent contradiction between Aristotle’s positions concerning the bees’ ability to hear in the Metaphysics and in the History of Animals. It does so not by appealing to external (chronological or philological) emendations, but by disambiguating the Ancient Greek verb akouein into three meanings: hearing of sound (psophos), of voice (phônê) and of speech (logos). Such a differentiation shows that, according to Aristotle, bees do hear other bees’ intermittent buzzes as meaningful and interested calls (...)
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  3.  10
    On Bees and Humans: Phenomenological Explorations of Hearing Sounds, Voices, and Speech in Aristotle.Ömer Orhan Aygün - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):337-350.
    This paper proposes a solution to the apparent contradiction between Aristotle’s positions concerning the bees’ ability to hear in the Metaphysics and in the History of Animals. It does so not by appealing to external emendations, but by disambiguating the Ancient Greek verb akouein into three meanings: hearing of sound, of voice and of speech. Such a differentiation shows that, according to Aristotle, bees do hear other bees’ intermittent buzzes as meaningful and interested calls for cooperation. This differentiation also hints (...)
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  4.  10
    The Role and Limits of Dialectical Method in Aristotelian Natural Science.Ömer Aygün - 2017 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2):427-451.
    In this paper, we offer an overview of Aristotle’s account for his belief that honeybees reproduce without copulation. Following this, we draw the three following implications: First, that Aristotle’s position on this question is quite unconventional, and undercuts many traditional and “Aristotelian” hierarchies; secondly, that the method that requires him to hold this unconventional position is largely dialectical; and finally, that the lineage behind this method is Socratic. In this sense, Aristotle’s biological work may be seen as taking up where (...)
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