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  1. The Historical-Investigative Approach to Teaching Science.Nahum Kipnis - 1996 - Science and Education, Kluwer Academic Publishers 5 (3):277-292.
    The paper describes the author's experience in using the history of science in teaching physics to science teachers. It was found that history becomes more useful to teachers when explicitly combined with 'investigative' experimentation, which, in turn. can benefit from various uses of the history of science.
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  2. The 'Historical-Investigative' Approach to Teaching Science.Nahum Kipnis - 1996 - Science & Education 5 (3):277-292.
    The paper describes the author's experience in using the history of science in teaching physics to science teachers. lt was found that history becomes more useful to teachers when explicitly combined with 'investigative' experimentation, which, in turn. can benefit from various uses of the history of science.
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    Chance in Science: The Discovery of Electromagnetism by H.C. Oersted.Nahum Kipnis - 2005 - Science & Education 14 (1):1-28.
    Ignoring therole of chance in science distorts the nature of the scientific process. Teachers can address this issue by means of several in-depth historical case studies, such as the discovery of electromagnetism by Oersted. Oersted was led to his lecture experiment by logic (two new hypotheses), but its success from the first trial was largely due to chance. Reproducing Oersted's experiment in the classroom complements the story by atlowing students to see for themselves the role of some accidental factors, such (...)
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    Scientific Analogies and Their Use in Teaching Science.Nahum Kipnis - 2005 - Science & Education 14 (3-5):199-233.
    Analogy in science knew its successes and failures, as illustrated by examples from the eighteenth-century physics. At times, some scientists abstained from using a certain analogy on the ground that it had not yet been demonstrated. Several false discoveries in the 18th and early 19th centuries appeared to support their caution. It is now clear that such a position reflected a methodological confusion that resulted from a failure to distinguish between particular and general analogies. Considering analogy as a hierarchical structure (...)
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    Scientific Controversies in Teaching Science: The Case of Volta.Nahum Kipnis - 2001 - Science & Education 10 (1-2):33-49.
    This paper discusses a way of introducing a scientific controversy, which emphasizes objective aspects of such issues as multiple theoretical interpretation of phenomena, choosing a theory, insistence on the chosen theory, and others. The goal is to give students a better insight into the workings of science and provide guidelines for building theories in their own research.
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  6. Discovery in Science and in Teaching Science.Nahum Kipnis - 2007 - Science & Education 16 (9-10):883-920.
    A proper presentation of scientific discoveries may allow science teachers to eliminate certain myths about the nature of science, which originate from an uncertainty among scholars about what constitutes a discovery. It is shown that a disagreement on this matter originates from a confusion of the act of discovery with response to it. It is suggested to separate these two concepts and also to distinguish the ‘scientific’ response from the ‘social’ one. The analysis is based on historical examples, primarily from (...)
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    Theories as Models in Teaching Physics.Nahum Kipnis - 1998 - Science & Education 7 (3):245-260.
    Discussing theories at length, including their origin, development, and replacement by other theories, can help students in understanding of both objective and subjective aspects of the scientific process. Presenting theories in the form of- models helps in this undertaking, and the history of science provides a number of suitable models. The paper describes specific examples that have been used in in-service courses for science teachers.
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  8. Book Reviews - ISIS: History of the Principle of Interference of Light.Nahum Kipnis - 1992 - Isis 83 (4):671-72.