Order:
  1.  17
    War and the Politics of Ethics.Maja Zehfuss - 2018 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the tension inherent in the waging of ethical war, and argues that war and its relationship to ethics need to be rethought fundamentally.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2. Constructivism in international relations: the politics of reality.Maja Zehfuss - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Maya Zehfuss critiques constructivist theories of international relations (currently considered to be at the cutting edge of the discipline) and finds them wanting and even politically dangerous. Zehfuss uses Germany's first shift toward using its military abroad after the end of the Cold War to illustrate why constructivism does not work and how it leads to particular analytical outcomes and forecloses others. She argues that scholars are limiting their abilities to act responsibly in international relations by looking towards constructivism as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3. 12 Jacques Derrida.Maja Zehfuss - 2009 - In Jenny Edkins & Nick Vaughan-Williams (eds.), Critical theorists and international relations. New York, N.Y.: Routledge. pp. 137.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Jacques Derrida.Maja Zehfuss - 2009 - In Jenny Edkins & Nick Vaughan-Williams (eds.), Critical theorists and international relations. New York, N.Y.: Routledge. pp. 137--149.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Poststructuralism.Maja Zehfuss - 2009 - In Patrick Hayden (ed.), The Ashgate Research Companion to Ethics and International Relations. Ashgate Publishing Company. pp. 97--111.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  20
    war and the memory of Nagasaki.Maja Zehfuss - 2015 - Thesis Eleven 129 (1):57-71.
    On the 70th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki the world remains marked by violent conflict and the possibility of nuclear war. This seems an apt moment to ask whether the bombings have left a trace in our thinking. This article thus explores how particular articulations of their memory or, alternatively, failures to articulate such a memory, conjure up our world: how they represent and account for violence and how, if at all, they assign specific significance to nuclear (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark