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  1. Ethics of Care and Concept of Jen: A Reply to Chenyang Li.Lijun Yuan - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):107-130.
    This comparative study of the ethics of care and the Confucian concept of jen argue against two assumptions made by Chenyang Li in his own study of these two traditions. Against him, I argue that a "feminine" morality is not adequate to address human equality, and that care-orientated theories like jen and care seem incompatible with the feminist commitment to oppose the subjection of women.
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  2. Ethics of Care and Concept Of.Lijun Yuan - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):107-129.
    : This comparative study of the ethics of care and the Confucian concept of jen argue against two assumptions made by Chenyang Li in his own study of these two traditions. Against him, I argue that a "feminine" morality is not adequate to address human equality, and that care-orientated theories like jen and care seem incompatible with the feminist commitment to oppose the subjection of women.
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    Ethics of Care and Concept of Jen: A Reply to Chenyang Li.Lijun Yuan - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):107-129.
    This comparative study of the ethics of care and the Confucian concept of jen argue against two assumptions made by Chenyang Li in his own study of these two traditions. Against him, I argue that a “feminine” morality is not adequate to address human equality, and that care-orientated theories like jen and care seem incompatible with the feminist commitment to oppose the subjection of women.
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    Ethics of Care and Concept of Jen : A Reply to Chenyang Li.Lijun Yuan - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):107-129.
    This comparative study of the ethics of care and the Confucian concept of jen argue against two assumptions made by Chenyang Li in his own study of these two traditions. Against him, I argue that a "feminine" morality is not adequate to address human equality, and that care-orientated theories like jen and care seem incompatible with the feminist commitment to oppose the subjection of women.
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    Confucian Ren and Feminist Ethics of Care: Integrating Relational Self, Power, and Democracy.Lijun Yuan - 2019 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    Confucian traditions have ingrained gender stratifications in Chinese culture today. Yuan proposes re-reading early Confucian texts as a vision of Ren with Dao with the unity of heaven, earth, and humanity, in order to reclaim the egalitarian aspects and develop openness for gender equity with integration of feminist critical care ethics.
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    A Balance of Justice and Care: Reading Feminist Ethics.Lijun Yuan - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:487-493.
    Since early the 1980s Feminist philosophers started to put up the value of care on agenda in study of ethics, investigating issues of valuing care as a balance of justice. A book came up as The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global in 2006, written by Virginia Held (VH). She called her balancing approach as “fairer caring” and caring justice”. These two terms show the essence of VH’s analysis of notions of care and justice: meshing them together as inseparable (...)
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    Reconceiving Women's Equality in China: A Critical Examination of Models of Sex Equality.Lijun Yuan - 2005 - Lexington Books.
    According to the author, the subordination of Chinese women continued under different models of sex equality in China in the twentieth century. In Reconceiving Women's Equality in China Lijun Yuan discusses and assesses four models of women’s equality. After exposing the common feature of their failure to reach the social ideal of women’s equality, the author proposes a more democratic conception of women’s equality that will allow ideals to continue changing as material circumstances change in different stages of social development.
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