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  1.  23
    Philosophy of Intellect in the Long Commentary on the De anima of Averroes.John Shannon Hendrix - 2012 - In Hendrix John Shannon (ed.), School of Architecture, Art, and Historic Preservation Faculty Publications.
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  2. Bishop Robert Grosseteste and Lincoln Cathedral: tracing relationships between medieval concepts of order and built form.Nicholas Temple, John Hendrix & Christia Frost (eds.) - 2014 - Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
    Bishop Robert Grosseteste and Lincoln Cathedral provides a much-needed and in-depth investigation of Grosseteste’s relationship to the medieval cathedral at Lincoln and the surrounding city. The architecture and topography of Lincoln Cathedral are examined in their cultural contexts, in relation to scholastic philosophy, science and cosmology, and medieval ideas about light and geometry, as highlighted in the writings of Robert Grosseteste - bishop of Lincoln Cathedral. At the same time the architecture of the cathedral is considered in relation to the (...)
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  3. Invitation to dialogue: the professional world.John Hendrix (ed.) - 1970 - Nashville, Tenn.,: Broadman Press.
     
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  4.  11
    Philosophy of Intellect and Vision in the De anima and De intellectu of Alexander of Aphrodisias.John Shannon Hendrix - 2010 - School of Architecture, Art, and Historic Preservation Faculty Publications.
    Alexander of Aphrodisias was born somewhere around 150, in Aphrodisia on the Aegean Sea. He began his career in Alexandria during the reign of Septimius Severus, was appointed to the peripatetic chair at the Lyceum in Athens in 198, a post established by Marcus Aurelius, wrote a commentary on the De anima of Aristotle, and died in 211. According to Porphyry, Alexander was an authority read in the seminars of Plotinus in Rome. He is the earliest philosopher who saw the (...)
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    Robert Grosseteste: philosophy of intellect and vision.John Shannon Hendrix - 2010 - Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag.
  6. The Architecture of Lincoln Cathedral and the Cosmologies of Bishop Grosseteste.John Hendrix - 2014 - In Nicholas Temple, John Hendrix & Christia Frost (eds.), Bishop Robert Grosseteste and Lincoln Cathedral: tracing relationships between medieval concepts of order and built form. Ashgate.
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  7.  28
    The Dialectics of Form and Functionin Architectural Aesthetics.John Hendrix - 2015 - Rivista di Estetica 58:31-45.
    It is through the dialectics of form and function in architecture, and in particular in the contradiction between the two, that the artistic and aesthetic dimensions of architecture can be developed: its expression of ideas, reflection of human identity, its ethics of responsibility to engage human culture, and its beauty. Architecture is capable of facilitating intellectual development, and of expressing ideas which transcend its material, programmatic and structural functions; in short, architecture is capable of being art, or poetry. Through its (...)
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  8.  3
    Unconscious thought in philosophy and psychoanalysis.John Shannon Hendrix - 2015 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Unconscious Thought in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis explores concepts throughout the history of philosophy that suggest the possibility of unconscious thought and lay the foundation for ideas of unconscious thought in modern philosophy and psychoanalysis. The focus is on the workings of unconscious thought, and the role that unconscious thought plays in thinking, language, perception, and human identity. The focus is on the metaphysical and philosophical concepts of unconscious thought, as opposed to the empirical or scientific phenomenon of 'the unconscious.' The (...)
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