17 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Jenny Pelletier [15]Jenny E. Pelletier [2]Jenny9 Pelletier [1]
  1.  22
    Getting Real: Ockham on the Human Contribution to the Nature and Production of Artifacts.Jenny Pelletier - 2022 - Philosophies 7 (5):90.
    Given his known predilection for ontological parsimony, Ockham’s ontology of artifacts is unsurprisingly reductionist: artifacts are nothing over and above their existing and appropriately ordered parts. However, the case of artifacts is notable in that they are real objects that human artisans produce by bringing about a real change: they spatially rearrange existing natural thing(s) or their parts for the sake of some end. This article argues that the human contribution to the nature and production of artifacts is two-fold: (1) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  39
    William Ockham on metaphysics: the science of being and God.Jenny E. Pelletier - 2013 - Boston: Brill.
    In William Ockham on Metaphysics, Jenny E. Pelletier gives an account of Ockham's concept of metaphysics as the science of being and God as it emerges sporadically throughout his philosophical and theological work.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  16
    Kingdoms and crowds: William Ockham on the ontology of social groups.Jenny Pelletier - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (1):24-44.
    ABSTRACT This paper reconstructs William of Ockham's (c. 1287–1347) account of the ontology of social groups. Across his writings, Ockham mentions kingdoms, religious orders, crowds, people, armies, and corporations. Using the political community as a case-study against the background of Ockham’s metaphysics of parts and wholes, it is argued that at least some social groups are identical to a plurality of many human beings who have decided to order themselves with respect to another in some particular way. In this regard, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  3
    Ockham on Human Freedom and the Nature and Origin of Lordship.Jenny Pelletier - 2021 - In Peter Adamson & Christof Rapp (eds.), State and Nature: Studies in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 393-414.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  12
    William Ockham on the Mental Ontology of Scientific Knowledge.Jenny Pelletier - 2018 - In Nicolas Faucher & Magali Roques (eds.), The Ontology, Psychology and Axiology of Habits (Habitus) in Medieval Philosophy. Cham: Springer. pp. 285-299.
    It has long been acknowledged that one of the most original aspects of Ockham’s account of knowledge is his contention that bodies of scientific knowledge are aggregates but without much explanation as to why he holds this view. In this chapter, I argue that a plausible philosophical motivation lies in the inner structure of his mental ontology, namely, in the intellect’s habits, acts, and their objects, which are the true and necessary principles and conclusions of demonstrations. Ockham upholds what I (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  25
    Walter chatton.Rondo Keele & Jenny Pelletier - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  7.  29
    Kingdoms and crowds: William Ockham on the ontology of social groups.Jenny Pelletier - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (1):24-44.
    This paper reconstructs William of Ockham's account of the ontology of social groups. Across his writings, Ockham mentions kingdoms, religious orders, crowds, people, armies, and cor...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  33
    Chatton and Ockham: A Fourteenth Century Discussion on Philosophical and Theological Concepts of God.Jenny Pelletier - 2015 - Franciscan Studies 73:147-167.
    In one of his Quodlibeta, William of Ockham entertains two concepts of God, one theological and the other philosophical. He argues that conclusions involving a theological concept of God are believable and can only be established in theology where recourse to faith is permissible. By contrast, conclusions involving a philosophical concept of God are knowable and can be proved in philosophy and theology. The source of these two concepts lies in the Sentences commentary of his confrère Walter Chatton,1 who explores (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  57
    Categories, and What is Beyond ed. by Gyula Klima, Alexander W. Hall (review).Jenny Pelletier - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):313-314.
    This slim volume contains a collection of eight essays that were originally given as lectures in 2002 under the aegis of the Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics. It is the second in a series of nine volumes published thus far, on subjects such as mental representation, free will, the ontology of individuation, the conceivability of God, skepticism, and nominalism. The title of the present volume is slightly misleading. Only the first two contributions are devoted to medieval treatments of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  6
    From Psychological to Factual Use.Jenny Pelletier - 2022 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 89 (1):77-108.
  11.  5
    Introduction to the Reality of the Social World: Medieval, Early Modern, and Contemporary Perspectives on Social Ontology.Jenny Pelletier & Christian Rode - 2023 - In Jenny E. Pelletier & Christian Rode (eds.), The Reality of the Social World: Medieval, Early Modern, and Contemporary Perspectives on Social Ontology. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 1-12.
    In this introduction, we briefly introduce the concept of social ontology, a fertile sub-field of contemporary analytic metaphysics, and present the motivation for the present volume, which is largely though not exclusively historical in scope. We explain that philosophers in the ancient, medieval, and early modern world, with an emphasis on the medieval tradition, likewise took up questions and issues that are now discussed by philosophers working in social ontology. We then present the contents of the volume and suggest further (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  19
    L'essentialisme de Guillaume d'Ockham by Magali Roques.Jenny Pelletier - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):347-348.
    In this short but dense monograph, Roques sets out to fill a significant lacuna in the literature on William of Ockham's logic, epistemology, and metaphysics: his theory of real definitions. Remarkably, the subject has received little attention, given that nominal definitions, specifically in connection to complex connotative concepts in mental language and their role in Ockham's ontological reductionism, have been a central focus since the early 1980s. One reason for this oversight may be the historical association between real definitions and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  20
    The Reality of the Social World: Medieval, Early Modern, and Contemporary Perspectives on Social Ontology.Jenny E. Pelletier & Christian Rode (eds.) - 2023 - Cham: Springer Verlag.
    This book offers a collection of contributions on medieval, early modern, and contemporary perspectives on social ontology. Since the 1990s, social ontology has emerged as a vibrant research area in contemporary analytical philosophy. Questions concerning the nature and properties of social groups, institutions, facts, and objects like money and marriage, have been thoroughly discussed. However, the historical perspective has been largely neglected. One of the central aims of this volume is to show that relevant views on social ontology can be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  48
    Walter Chatton on Enumerating the Categories.Jenny Pelletier - forthcoming - New Content is Available for Vivarium.
    _ Source: _Page Count 24 Although the fourteenth-century Franciscan theologian Walter Chatton did not comment on Aristotle’s _Categories_, he discussed a number of issues relating to categories in his _Lectura_ on the _Sentences_. The author examines his response to the question ‘How many categories are there?’ He gives three methods by which we can arrive at the number of the categories, the last two of which seem to meet his approval. Chatton advocates a strong isomorphism between ontology and semantics: the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  45
    Walter Chatton on Enumerating the Categories.Jenny Pelletier - 2016 - Vivarium 54 (4):311-334.
    _ Source: _Page Count 24 Although the fourteenth-century Franciscan theologian Walter Chatton did not comment on Aristotle’s _Categories_, he discussed a number of issues relating to categories in his _Lectura_ on the _Sentences_. The author examines his response to the question ‘How many categories are there?’ He gives three methods by which we can arrive at the number of the categories, the last two of which seem to meet his approval. Chatton advocates a strong isomorphism between ontology and semantics: the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  5
    William Ockham on Craft: Knowing How to Build Houses on the Canadian Shield.Jenny Pelletier - 2021 - In Isabelle Chouinard, Zoe McConaughey, Aline Medeiros Ramos & Roxane Noël (eds.), Women’s Perspectives on Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp. 303-318.
    Towards the end of Aline Medeiros Ramos’s study of John Buridan on craft as an intellectual virtue, she mentions William Ockham in passing and points towards his conception of craft. In this paper, I take up her implicit invitation to explore that conception. I begin by reconstructing Ockham’s notion of craft, and then proceed to discuss three consequences of that conception: the moral neutrality of craft, the role of deliberation in craftwork, and the epistemic status of craft and the craftworker. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  25
    Review of Categories, and What is Beyond (forthcoming). [REVIEW]Jenny Pelletier - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark