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  1. The Pious Sex: Essays on Women and Religion in the History of Political Thought.Amy L. Bonnette, Lise van Boxel, Catherine Connors, Eve Grace, Heather King, Paul Ludwig, Clifford Orwin, Kathrin H. Rosenfield, Dana Jalbert Stauffer & Diana J. Schaub (eds.) - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    This collection of original essays examines the relationship between women and religion in the history of political thought broadly conceived. This theme is a remarkably revealing lens through which to view the Western philosophical and poetical traditions that have culminated in secular and egalitarian modern society. The essays also give highly analytical accounts of the manifold and intricate relationships between religion, family and public life in the history of political thought, and the various ways in which these relationships have manifested (...)
     
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  2. Beyond Sense and Sensibility: Moral Formation and the Literary Imagination From Johnson to Wordsworth.Rhona Brown, Leslie A. Chilton, Timothy Erwin, Evan Gottlieb, Christopher D. Johnson, Heather King, James Noggle, Adam Rounce & Adrianne Wadewitz (eds.) - 2014 - Bucknell University Press.
    Drawing on philosophical thought from the eighteenth century as well as conceptual frameworks developed in the twenty-first century, the essays in Beyond Sense and Sensibility examine moral formation as represented in or implicitly produced by literary works of late eighteenth-century British authors.
     
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    Examining Student Engagement with Science Through a Bourdieusian Notion of Field.Spela Godec, Heather King, Louise Archer, Emily Dawson & Amy Seakins - 2018 - Science & Education 27 (5-6):501-521.
    Student engagement with science is a long-standing, central interest within science education research. In this article, we examine student engagement with science using a Bourdiusian lens, placing a particular emphasis on the notion of field. Over the course of one academic year, we collected data in an inner London secondary science classroom through lesson observations, interviews and discussion groups with students, and interviews with the teacher. We argue that applying Bourdieusian theory can help better understand differential patterns of student engagement (...)
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