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  1.  26
    Empowerment through health self-testing apps? Revisiting empowerment as a process.Alexandra Kapeller & Iris Loosman - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (1):143-152.
    Empowerment, an already central concept in public health, has gained additional relevance through the expansion of mobile health (mHealth). Especially direct-to-consumer self-testing app companies mobilise the term to advertise their products, which allow users to self-test for various medical conditions independent of healthcare professionals. This article first demonstrates the absence of empowerment conceptualisations in the context of self-testing apps by engaging with empowerment literature. It then contrasts the service these apps provide with two widely cited empowerment definitions by the WHO, (...)
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  2.  18
    Ethico-Political Aspects of Conceptualizing Screening: The Case of Dementia.Martin Gunnarson, Alexandra Kapeller & Kristin Zeiler - 2021 - Health Care Analysis 29 (4):343-359.
    While the value of early detection of dementia is largely agreed upon, population-based screening as a means of early detection is controversial. This controversial status means that such screening is not recommended in most national dementia plans. Some current practices, however, resemble screening but are labelled “case-finding” or “detection of cognitive impairment”. Labelled as such, they may avoid the ethical scrutiny that population-based screening may be subject to. This article examines conceptualizations of screening and case-finding. It shows how the definitions (...)
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  3.  15
    Phenomenology and empowerment in self‐testing apps.Alexandra Kapeller - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Although self‐testing apps, a form of mobile health (mHealth) apps, are often marketed as empowering, it is not obvious how exactly they can empower their users—and in which sense of the word. In this article, I discuss two conceptualisations of empowerment as polar opposites—one in health promotion/mHealth and one in feminist theory—and demonstrate how both their applications to individually used self‐testing apps run into problems. The first, prevalent in health promotion and mHealth, focuses on internal states and understands empowerment as (...)
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  4.  40
    A Taxonomy of Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Wearable Robots: An Expert Perspective.Alexandra Kapeller, Heike Felzmann, Eduard Fosch-Villaronga & Ann-Marie Hughes - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (6):3229-3247.
    Wearable robots and exoskeletons are relatively new technologies designed for assisting and augmenting human motor functions. Due to their different possible design applications and their intimate connection to the human body, they come with specific ethical, legal, and social issues, which have not been much explored in the recent ELS literature. This paper draws on expert consultations and a literature review to provide a taxonomy of the most important ethical, legal, and social issues of wearable robots. These issues are categorized (...)
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  5.  1
    Self-Testing for Dementia: A Phenomenological Analysis of Fear.Alexandra Kapeller & Marjolein de Boer - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-15.
    Following the growing economic relevance of mobile health (mHealth) and the increasing global prevalence of dementia, self-testing apps for dementia and mild neurocognitive disorder (MCD) have been developed and advertised. The apps’ promise of a quick and easy tool has been criticized in the literature from a variety of angles, but as we argue in this article, the celebratory characterization of self-testing also stands in disbalance to the various kinds of fears that may be connected to taking the test. By (...)
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