Conceiving Wholeness: Women, Motherhood, and Ovarian Transplantation, 1902 and 2004

Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (3):409-416 (2011)
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Abstract

When one thinks about organ transplantation, the organs that usually come to mind are the heart, or possibly the kidney, the most commonly transplanted organ (UNOS 2008). Transplantations are generally regarded as necessary to the life of the person receiving the transplant or to physiologically improving that life: the transplant is seen as making the recipient “whole” once more (Lederer 2008). While many have commented on the various ethical issues brought forth by the clinical practice of organ transplantation, here we are concerned with the idea of becoming whole from organ transplantation. The idea of wholeness that a transplant renders can extend beyond the physiological to the individual, the familial, and ..

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