55 found
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  1.  29
    Reproductive technologies are not the cure for social problems.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (2):85-86.
    Giulia Cavaliere disagrees with claims that ectogenesis will increase equality and freedom for women, arguing that they often ignore social context and consequently fail to recognise that ectogenesis may not benefit women or it may only benefit a small subset of already privileged women. In this commentary, I will contextualise her argument within the broader cultural milieu to highlight the pattern of reproductive advancements and technologies, such as egg freezing and birth control, being presented as the panacea for women’s inequality. (...)
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  2.  40
    Freezing fertility or freezing false hope? A content analysis of social egg freezing in U.S. print media.Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Rohia Aziz, Shilpa Darivemula, Jennifer Raffaele, Rajani Bhatia & Wendy M. Parker - 2018 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 9 (3):181-193.
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  3.  12
    Procreative loss without pregnancy loss: the limitations of fetal-centric conceptions of pregnancy.Hannah Carpenter, Georgia Loutrianakis, Peyton Baker, Tiffany Bystra & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (5):310-311.
    In their article, Romanis and Adkins delineate pregnancy loss and procreative loss to show that the former is possible without the latter, as in the case of artificial amnion and placenta technology.1 Here, we are interested in examining the reverse—procreative loss without pregnancy loss—to further tease apart these two types of loss. We discuss two cases: being forced to continue a pregnancy despite fetal demise due to abortion restrictions and choosing to selectively reduce a multifetal pregnancy. Our analysis buttresses the (...)
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  4.  8
    Disentangling the individualisation argument against non-medical egg freezing from feminist critiques.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (3):171-172.
    According to Petersen, ‘the individualization argument against NMEF [nonmedical egg freezing]’ states: ‘it is morally wrong to let individuals use technology X [NMEF] – in order to try to handle a problem that is social in nature – if the use of X [NMEF] will somehow work against a social solution to a social problem P [gender inequality in the labor market]’. While there may be individuals making individualisation argument against NMEF, I do not read the scholars he discusses—Karey Harwood,1 (...)
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  5.  13
    The Relational and Gendered Nature of Reproductive Medicine.Georgia Loutrianakis & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (3):62-63.
    In assessing the ethics of fetal therapy trials, we agree with Hendriks et al. that we should not just consider biomedical benefits, but also psychosocial benefits. Specifically, we argue th...
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  6.  48
    Preserving the Right to Future Children: An Ethical Case Analysis.Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Daniel K. Stearsman, Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Devin Murphy - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):38-43.
    We report on the case of a 2-year-old female, the youngest person ever to undergo ovarian tissue cryopreservation (OTC). This patient was diagnosed with a rare form of sickle cell disease, which required a bone-marrow transplant, and late effects included high risk of future infertility or complete sterility. Ethical concerns are raised, as the patient's mother made the decision for OTC on the patient's behalf with the intention that this would secure the option of biological childbearing in the future. Based (...)
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  7.  17
    The Biomedicalization of Social Egg Freezing: A Comparative Analysis of European and American Professional Ethics Opinions and US News and Popular Media.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Rajani Bhatia - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (5):864-887.
    In 2012, two major professional societies representing Europe and the United States released influential statements that would propel a commercial market for social egg freezing, in which women bank their oocytes for later use in order to avoid compromised fertility that comes with age. While the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology condoned SEF based on reproductive autonomy and justice, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine discouraged SEF based on insufficient data and concerns about false hope. In this article, (...)
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  8.  26
    Confronting the Hidden Curriculum: A Four-Year Integrated Course in Ethics and Professionalism Grounded in Virtue Ethics.Wayne Shelton & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (4):689-703.
    We describe a virtue ethics approach and its application in a four-year, integrated, longitudinal, and required undergraduate medical education course that attempts to address some of the challenges of the hidden curriculum and minimize some of its adverse effects on learners. We discuss how a curriculum grounded in virtue ethics strives to have the practical effect of allowing students to focus on their professional identity as physicians in training rather than merely on knowledge and skills acquisition. This orientation, combined with (...)
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  9.  66
    An Obscure Rider Obstructing Science: The Conflation of Parthenotes with Embryos in the Dickey–Wicker Amendment.Teresa Woodruff, Candace Tingen, Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Sarah Rodriguez - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (3):20-28.
    (2011). An Obscure Rider Obstructing Science: The Conflation of Parthenotes with Embryos in the Dickey–Wicker Amendment. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 20-28.
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  10.  11
    Familial Discordance Regarding Fertility Preservation for a Transgender Teen: An Ethical Case Study.Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Amani Sampson & Gwendolyn P. Quinn - 2018 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 29 (4):261-265.
    A 16-year-old adolescent who identifies as transgender wishes to consider fertility preservation prior to the use of gender-affirming hormones. The adolescent’s parents are divorced, and one parent supports fertility preservation while the other does not. This case explores the minor’s future reproductive autonomy and parental decision making in a field where there is limited evidence of known harms and benefits to the use of fertility preservation in the transgender population and about future potential regret from lack of consideration of fertility (...)
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  11.  47
    Bad moms, blameless dads: The portrayal of maternal and paternal age and preconception harm in U.S. newspapers.Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Laura Beth Santacrose, Zubin Master & Wendy M. Parker - 2016 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 7 (1):56-63.
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  12.  31
    Suicide in the Context of Terminal Illness.Jane Jankowski & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (3):13-14.
  13.  9
    Conscience Claims and Cost: Tribunals and the Asymmetry Debate.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & David Michael Vaughan - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (8):70-72.
    We appreciate Fritz’s thoughtful analysis of the asymmetry between legal protections for negative and positive conscience claims and are particularly interested in further exploring the conc...
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  14.  39
    No More Larking Around! Why We Need Male LARCs.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (5):22-26.
    Modern contraceptives—especially long-acting, reversible contraceptives, or LARCs—are typically seen as a boon for humanity and for women, the majority of their users, in particular. But the disparity between the number and types of female and male LARCs is problematic for at least two reasons: first, because it forces women to assume most of the financial and health-related responsibilities of contraception, and second, because men’s reproductive autonomy is diminished by it. In order to understand how to change our current contraceptive arrangement, (...)
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  15.  82
    Paternal-Fetal Harm and Men’s Moral Duty to Use Contraception: Applying the Principles of Nonmaleficence and Beneficence to Men’s Reproductive Responsibility.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2014 - Medicine Studies 4 (1):1-13.
    Discussions of reproductive responsibility generally draw heavily upon the principles of nonmaleficence and beneficence. However, these principles are typically only applied to women due to the incorrect belief that only women can cause fetal harm. The cultural perception that women are likely to cause fetal and child harm is reflected in numerous social norms, policies, and laws. Conversely, there is little public discussion of men and fetal and child harm, which implies that men do not (or cannot) cause such harm. (...)
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  16.  23
    Insuring against Infertility: Expanding State Infertility Mandates to Include Fertility Preservation Technology for Cancer Patients.Daniel Basco, Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Sarah Rodriguez - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):832-839.
    Melanie was 29-years-old, married, and hoping to start a family when she discovered a lump in her pelvis. She was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. But one of her biggest fears upon learning of her diagnosis was the possibility of loosing her ability to have children. When Melanie asked her oncologist and radiation oncologist about the risk cancer treatment posed to her fertility, they told her it was small, as only one ovary would be destroyed during the radiation. Deciding to ask (...)
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  17.  30
    Suicide in the Context of Terminal Illness.Jane Jankowski & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):13 - 14.
  18.  55
    Rape as a Hate Crime: An Analysis of New York Law.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (1):91-106.
    New York defines rape as forced penile vaginal penetration, which means only women can be rape victims. Given this definition, rape should always be considered a type of hate crime and thus eligible for sentencing enhancement because the perpetrators target victims based on their group membership. Such a narrow definition of rape is problematic because it fails to acknowledge oral and anal rape and overlooks the fact that men can also be raped. I argue that regardless of the type of (...)
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  19.  53
    Should Health Care Providers Uphold the DNR of a Terminally Ill Patient Who Attempts Suicide?Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Jane Jankowski & Marcy Mullen - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (2):169-174.
    An individual’s right to refuse life-sustaining treatment is a fundamental expression of patient autonomy; however, supporting this right poses ethical dilemmas for healthcare providers when the patient has attempted suicide. Emergency physicians encounter patients who have attempted suicide and are likely among the first medical providers to face the dilemma of honoring the patient’s DNR or intervening to reverse the effects of potentially fatal actions. We illustrate this issue by introducing a case example in which the DNR of a terminally (...)
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  20.  17
    Dueling Definitions of Abortifacient: How Cultural, Political, and Religious Values Affect Language in the Contraception Debate.Claire Horner & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (4):14-19.
    Contraception works by preventing fertilization of an egg or preventing implantation of a fertilized embryo. For those who believe pregnancy begins at implantation, contraceptives preventing implantation are not abortifacient. However, for those who assert that pregnancy begins at fertilization, any agent causing the intentional loss of an embryo, even prior to implantation, is abortifacient, both morally and for lack of a different term to describe the postfertilization, preimplantation loss. In the debate on this topic, much of the discourse on both (...)
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  21.  16
    Fertility Preservation for a Teenager with Differences (Disorders) of Sex Development: An Ethics Case Study.Courtney Finlayson, Emilie K. Johnson, Arlene B. Baratz, Diane Chen & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2019 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 30 (2):143-153.
    Fertility preservation has become more common for various populations, including oncology patients, transgender individuals, and women who are concerned about age-related infertility. Little attention has been paid to fertility preservation for patients with differences/disorders of sex development (DSD). Our goal in this article is to address specific ethical considerations that are unique to this patient population. To this end, we present a hypothetical DSD case. We then explore ethical considerations related to patient’s age, risk of cancer, concern about genetic transmission (...)
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  22.  10
    Confidence in Care Instead of Capacity: A Feminist Approach to Opioid Overdose.Kathryn A. Cunningham, Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Emma Tumilty & Jessica Olivares - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (5):51-53.
    The article “Revive and Refuse: Capacity, Autonomy, and Refusal of Care After Opioid Overdose,” Marshall et al. (2024) highlights the critical issue of care after an opioid overdose. “Revive and Re...
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  23.  60
    Insuring Against Infertility: Expanding State Infertility Mandates to Include Fertility Preservation Technology for Cancer Patients.Daniel Basco, Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Sarah Rodriguez - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):832-839.
    In this paper, we recommend expanding infertility insurance mandates to people who may become infertile because of cancer treatments. Such an expansion would ensure cancer patients can receive fertility preservation technology (FPT) prior to commencing treatment. We base our proposal for extending coverage to cancer patients on the infertility mandate in Massachusetts because it is one of the most inclusive. While we use Massachusetts as a model, our arguments and analysis of possible routes to coverage can be applied to all (...)
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  24.  27
    Expanding the Clinical Definition of Infertility to Include Socially Infertile Individuals and Couples.Weei Lo & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2018 - In Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Paul Burcher (eds.), Reproductive Ethics Ii: New Ideas and Innovations. Springer Verlag. pp. 71-83.
    In the United States, single individuals and LGBTQ couples who wish to conceive biological children are considered to be “socially infertile” due to their relationship status. Due to the high cost of infertility treatments and inadequate insurance coverage, the socially infertile has minimal access to assisted reproductive technology. Under the current medical definitions of infertility, even in states with infertility insurance mandates, only heterosexual couples with physiological infertility are covered for ART. It is well documented that infertility interferes with many (...)
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  25.  37
    A Two-Pronged Approach to Minimizing Harms for Transgender Youth: Medical Interventions and Social Interventions.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):85-87.
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  26.  11
    Paternal-Fetal Harm and Men’s Moral Duty to Use Contraception: Applying the Principles of Nonmaleficence and Beneficence to Men’s Reproductive Responsibility.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2014 - Medicine Studies 4 (1):1-13.
    Discussions of reproductive responsibility generally draw heavily upon the principles of nonmaleficence and beneficence. However, these principles are typically only applied to women due to the incorrect belief that only women can cause fetal harm. The cultural perception that women are likely to cause fetal and child harm is reflected in numerous social norms, policies, and laws. Conversely, there is little public discussion of men and fetal and child harm, which implies that men do not (or cannot) cause such harm. (...)
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  27.  27
    In Our Own Words: A Qualitative Exploration of Complex Patient-Provider Interactions in an LGBTQ Population.Saba Malik, Zubin Master, Wendy Parker, Barry DeCoster & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - unknown
    While sexual and gender minorities are at increased risk for poor health outcomes, there is limited data regarding patient-provider interactions. In this study, we explored the perspectives of LGBTQ patients and their encounters with physicians in order to improve our understanding of patient-physician experiences. Using purposive selection of self-identified LGBTQ patients, we performed fourteen in-depth semi-structured interviews on topics of sexual orientation and gender identity, as well as their perceived role in the patient-provider relationship. Coding using a modified grounded theory (...)
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  28.  34
    Offering Testicular Tissue Cryopreservation to Boys: The Increasing Importance of Biological Fatherhood.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):39 - 40.
  29.  26
    Offering Testicular Tissue Cryopreservation to Boys: The Increasing Importance of Biological Fatherhood.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (3):39-40.
  30.  28
    Competing Social Norms.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2012 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):67-84.
    A necessary component to reproductive autonomy is being trusted to make reproductive decisions. In the case of contraception, however, women are considered both trustworthy and untrustworthy. Women are held responsible for contraception and because responsibility usually stems from trust, it appears that women are trusted with contraception. Yet myriad laws and forms of surveillance and normalization surrounding contraception make women seem untrustworthy. Relying on Amy Mullin’s conception of trust that we trust those who we assume believe in the same social (...)
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  31.  20
    Artificial Womb Technology and the Restructuring of Gestational Boundaries.Richard B. Gibson & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (5):106-108.
    In their article, De Bie et al. (2023) provide a scoping review of the ethical and socio-legal issues arising from research into, and the potential, maybe even likely deployment of, artificial womb...
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  32.  19
    Air Ball: Missing the Net on Female Elite Athletes’ Reproductive Health.Shehani Jayawickrama, Georgia Loutrianakis, Kathleen Vincent & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2023 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 16 (1):21-33.
    We argue the dearth of research on elite ciswomen athletes’ reproductive health is because athletics remains associated with masculinity, and female athletes therefore do not adhere to normative femininity and motherhood. In choosing a masculine career, it is assumed that elite athletes will reject other feminine activities, such as motherhood. We further argue that female athletes are considered especially ineligible for motherhood because their career choice violates normative motherhood by engaging in “risky” behavior (i.e., physical activity). By continuing with their (...)
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  33.  12
    No clitting! We need to talk about clitoris transplantation.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (9):838-845.
    In the last two decades, genital transplants have emerged as another type of quality‐of‐life transplants. Successful allogenic transplantations of the uterus, ovary, testicle, and penis have all been reported. Yet, there is no discussion of clitoris transplantation in the medical literature, mass media, and everywhere else I searched. This surgery could be used for cisgender women who have a clitoral injury or disease or who have undergone female genital cutting. I examine the gender norms regarding sexuality and reproduction to show (...)
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  34.  17
    Clinicians’ criteria for fetal moral status: viability and relationality, not sentience.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Elise Andaya - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    The antiabortion movement is increasingly using ostensibly scientific measurements such as ‘fetal heartbeat’ and ‘fetal pain’ to provide ‘objective’ evidence of the moral status of fetuses. However, there is little knowledge on how clinicians conceptualise and operationalise the moral status of fetuses. We interviewed obstetrician/gynaecologists and neonatologists on this topic since their practice regularly includes clinical management of entities of the same gestational age. Contrary to our expectations, there was consensus among clinicians about conceptions of moral status regardless of specialty. (...)
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  35. Conscientious objection and LGBTQ discrimination in the United States.Abram Brummett & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2021 - Journal of Public Health Policy 42 (2).
    Given recent legal developments in the United States, now is a critical time to draw attention to how ‘conscientious objection’ is sometimes used by health care providers to discriminate against the LGBTQ community. We review legal developments from 2019 and present several cases where health care providers used conscientious objection in ways that discriminate against the LGBTQ community, resulting in damaged trust by this underserved population. We then discuss two important conceptual points in this debate. The first involves the interpretation (...)
     
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  36.  2
    Breaking Binaries: The Critical Need for Feminist Bioethics in Pediatric Gender‐Affirming Care.Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Grayson R. Jackson & Jacob D. Moses - 2024 - Hastings Center Report 54 (3):55-56.
    This commentary responds to Moti Gorin's article “What Is the Aim of Pediatric ‘Gender‐Affirming’ Care?” We argue that Gorin's case against pediatric gender‐affirming care rests upon numerous false conceptual binaries: female/male, public/private, objective/subjective, and medically necessary/elective. Drawing on feminist bioethics, we show how such dichotomous thinking is both inaccurate and marginalizing of gender minorities.
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  37.  72
    Cultural Memory, Empathy, and Rape.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2009 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):25-42.
    Assuming a relational understanding of the self, I argue that empathy is necessary for individual and cultural recovery from rape. However, gender affects our ability to listen with empathy to rape survivors. For women, the existence of cultural memories discourages empathy either by engendering fear of their own future rape or by provoking sympathy rather than empathy. For men, the lack of cultural memories makes rape what Arendt calls an "unreality," thus diminishing the possibility for empathy. Although empathetic listeningpresents gender (...)
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  38.  11
    Conceiving Masculinity: Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity, by Liberty Walther BarnesConceiving Masculinity: Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity, by Liberty Walther Barnes. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2014.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2015 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):271-274.
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  39.  9
    Conceiving Masculinity: Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity, by Liberty Walther Barnes.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2015 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):271-274.
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  40.  58
    Costa rica's 'white legend': How racial narratives undermine its health care system.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Karen Meagher - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (2):99-107.
    A dominant cultural narrative within Costa Rica describes Costa Ricans not only as different from their Central American neighbours, but it also exalts them as better: specifically, as more white, peaceful, egalitarian and democratic. This notion of Costa Rican exceptionalism played a key role in the creation of their health care system, which is based on the four core principles of equity, universality, solidarity and obligation. While the political justification and design of the current health care system does, in part, (...)
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  41.  47
    Goodbye hypatia, my friend.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 233-235.
  42.  33
    Goodbye Hypatia, My Friend.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Managing Editor - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):233-235.
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  43.  22
    Goodbye Hypatia, My Friend.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):233-235.
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  44.  12
    Gametes or organs? How should we legally classify ovaries used for transplantation in the USA?Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):166-170.
    Ovarian tissue transplantation is an experimental procedure that can be used to treat both infertility and premature menopause. Working within the current legal framework in the USA, I examine whether ovarian tissue should be legally treated like gametes or organs in the case of ovarian tissue transplantation between two women. One option is to base classification upon its intended use: ovarian tissue used to treat infertility would be classified like gametes, and ovarian tissue used to treat premature menopause would be (...)
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  45.  7
    Reproductive Ethics Ii: New Ideas and Innovations.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Paul Burcher (eds.) - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    This book is the second collection of essays on reproductive ethics from Drs. Campo-Engelstein and Burcher. This volume is unique in that it is both timely and includes several essays on new technologies, while also being a comprehensive review of most of the major questions in the field, from racial disparities in reproductive healthcare to gene editing and the possibility of the creation of a transhuman species. The scholars writing these essays are pre-eminent in their fields, and their backgrounds are (...)
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  46.  7
    Reproductive Ethics: Introduction.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Paul Burcher - 2018 - In Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Paul Burcher (eds.), Reproductive Ethics Ii: New Ideas and Innovations. Springer Verlag. pp. 1-5.
    Until quite recently human reproduction was considered an entirely natural process, and the ethics of reproduction were governed more by cultural mores and religious strictures than by any serious philosophical or empirical inquiry. However, more recently reproductive ethics has exploded as a field for several reasons. At a cultural level, many things taken for granted a generation ago, including the increasing medicalization of birth and the heteronormative two-parent nuclear family, have been challenged, and new possibilities have arisen from these now (...)
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  47.  7
    Reproductive Ethics: New Challenges and Conversations.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Paul Burcher (eds.) - 2017 - Springer.
    This book summarizes the contributions at an April 2016 conference held at Albany Medical College, Reproductive Ethics: New Challenges and Conversations. Reproductive ethics does not suffer from a lack of challenging issues, yet a few "hot button" issues such as abortion and surrogacy seem to attract most of the attention, while other issues and dilemmas remain relatively underdeveloped in bioethics literature. The goal of this book is to explore and expand the range of topics addressed in reproductive ethics. This is (...)
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  48.  60
    Two Chicks in a Lab with Eggs.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Sarah B. Rodriguez - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (3):21-23.
    One winter morning, the two of us—both postdoctoral fellows in medical humanities and bioethics—gathered with a handful of reproductive science graduate students in the lab to watch a demonstration on making alginate beads. Due to their three-dimensional nature, the beads are capable of holding ovarian follicles—the beads act as though they were a small ovary. The scientists in the lab have managed to mature the follicles maintained in the beads into eggs, fertilize these eggs, and produce the birth of live (...)
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  49.  44
    A Better Half: The Ethics of Hemicorporectomy Surgery.Jane Jankowski & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):289-294.
    This paper discusses the ethical issues related to hemicorporectomy surgery, a radical procedure that removes the lower half of the body in order to prolong life. The literature on hemicorporectomy (HC), also called translumbar amputation, has been nearly silent on the ethical considerations relevant to this rare procedure. We explore five aspects of the complex landscape of hemicorporectomy to illustrate the broader ethical questions related to this extraordinary procedure: benefits, risks, informed consent, resource allocation and justice, and loss and the (...)
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  50.  24
    Medical Sexism: Contraception Access, Reproductive Medicine, and Health Care by Jill B. Delston.Deborah McNabb & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2021 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 14 (2):200-204.
    In Medical Sexism: Contraception Access, Reproductive Medicine, and Health Care, Jill B. Delston uses a feminist lens to examine the overwhelmingly common gynecological practice of declining to write prescriptions for oral contraceptives unless a woman agrees to an annual Pap smear, which is used to detect precancerous changes, as well as cancer of the cervix. Employing a comprehensive evaluation of the medical literature, Delston methodically builds a strong argument that these measures not only do not follow evidence-based medical guidelines, but (...)
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