Formal Learning Theory and the Philosophy of Science

PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:413 - 423 (1988)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Formal learning theory is an approach to the study of inductive inference that has been developed by computer scientists. In this paper, I discuss the relevance of formal learning theory to such standard topics in the philosophy of science as underdetermination, realism, scientific progress, methodology, bounded rationality, the problem of induction, the logic of discovery, the theory of knowledge, the philosophy of artificial intelligence, and the philosophy of psychology.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 74,594

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Formal Learning Theory.Oliver Schulte - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Logically Reliable Inductive Inference.Oliver Schulte - 2007 - In Michele Friend, Norma B. Goethe & Valentina Harizanov (eds.), Induction, algorithmic learning theory, and philosophy. Springer. pp. 157-178.
Agency and Interaction What We Are and What We Do in Formal Epistemology.Jeffrey Helzner & Vincent Hendricks - 2010 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 27 (2).
No Answer to Hume.Colin Howson - 2011 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (3):279 - 284.
The New Enlightenment Hypothesis: All Learners Are Rational.Rita Nolan - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):219-220.
A Material Theory of Induction.John D. Norton - 2003 - Philosophy of Science 70 (4):647-670.

Analytics

Added to PP
2011-05-29

Downloads
55 (#212,532)

6 months
7 (#108,712)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references