Young Children's Folk Knowledge of Robots

Asian Culture and History 2 (2):P111 (2010)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Children, in their everyday lives, encounter several types of humanoid robots. The purpose of this study was to investigate children’s folk knowledge of robots using the card-choice task. In the task, both adults and five- and six-year-old children were given nine questions concerning the biological and psychological properties of robots. They were asked to choose the appropriate stimuli from among five objects including living things, nonliving things, and a robot. The results revealed that the children tended to attribute certain biological properties to the robot. These results accorded with previous results. However, in our study, contrary to previous such studies, even older children showed such a tendency. Moreover, the children were unable to choose all the cards in the same way as the adults. Thus, it can be concluded that children’s knowledge of robots is incomplete. And the children’s knowledge is changed by method

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 94,623

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

The role of social eye-gaze in children’s and adults’ ownership attributions to robotic agents in three cultures.Patricia Kanngiesser, Shoji Itakura, Yue Zhou, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Bruce Hood - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (1):1-28.
Does appearance matter in the interaction of children with autism with a humanoid robot?Ben Robins, Kerstin Dautenhahn & Janek Dubowski - 2006 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 7 (3):479-512.
Can young children learn words from a robot?Yusuke Moriguchi, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Yoko Shimada & Shoji Itakura - 2011 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 12 (1):107-118.
Children’s acceptance of social robots.Chiara de Jong, Jochen Peter, Rinaldo Kühne & Alex Barco - 2019 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 20 (3):393-425.

Analytics

Added to PP
2013-11-23

Downloads
60 (#265,195)

6 months
34 (#119,615)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?