20 found
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  1. A Robot Is Not Worth Another: Exploring Children’s Mental State Attribution to Different Humanoid Robots.Federico Manzi, Giulia Peretti, Cinzia Di Dio, Angelo Cangelosi, Shoji Itakura, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Davide Massaro & Antonella Marchetti - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  2.  24
    Do infants bind mental states to agents?Dora Kampis, Eszter Somogyi, Shoji Itakura & Ildikó Király - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):232-240.
  3.  18
    Do Infants Attribute Moral Traits? Fourteen-Month-Olds' Expectations of Fairness Are Affected by Agents' Antisocial Actions.Luca Surian, Mika Ueno, Shoji Itakura & Marek Meristo - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  4.  37
    The power of human gaze on infant learning.Yuko Okumura, Yasuhiro Kanakogi, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Shoji Itakura - 2013 - Cognition 128 (2):127-133.
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  5.  28
    Individual differences in object-processing explain the relationship between early gaze-following and later language development.Yuko Okumura, Yasuhiro Kanakogi, Tessei Kobayashi & Shoji Itakura - 2017 - Cognition 166 (C):418-424.
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  6.  75
    Can young children learn words from a robot?Yusuke Moriguchi, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Yoko Shimada & Shoji Itakura - 2011 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 12 (1):107-118.
    Young children generally learn words from other people. Recent research has shown that children can learn new actions and skills from nonhuman agents. This study examines whether young children could learn words from a robot. Preschool children were shown a video in which either a woman or a mechanical robot labeled novel objects. Then the children were asked to select the objects according to the names used in the video. The results revealed that children in the human condition were more (...)
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  7.  21
    Can infants use robot gaze for object learning?: The effect of verbalization.Yuko Okumura, Yasuhiro Kanakogi, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Shoji Itakura - 2013 - Interaction Studies 14 (3):351-365.
  8.  21
    Can infants use robot gaze for object learning?Yuko Okumura, Yasuhiro Kanakogi, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Shoji Itakura - 2013 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 14 (3):351-365.
    Previous research has shown that although infants follow the gaze direction of robots, robot gaze does not facilitate infants’ learning for objects. The present study examined whether robot gaze affects infants’ object learning when the gaze behavior was accompanied by verbalizations. Twelve-month-old infants were shown videos in which a robot with accompanying verbalizations gazed at an object. The results showed that infants not only followed the robot’s gaze direction but also preferentially attended to the cued object when the ostensive verbal (...)
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  9.  39
    The role of social eye-gaze in children’s and adults’ ownership attributions to robotic agents in three cultures.Patricia Kanngiesser, Shoji Itakura, Yue Zhou, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Bruce Hood - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (1):1-28.
    Young children often treat robots as social agents after they have witnessed interactions that can be interpreted as social. We studied in three experiments whether four-year-olds from three cultures and adults from two cultures will attribute ownership of objects to a robot that engages in social gaze with a human. Participants watched videos of robot-human interactions, in which objects were possessed or new objects were created. Children and adults applied the same ownership rules to humans and robots – irrespective of (...)
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  10.  74
    Object Categorization Processing Differs According to Category Level: Comparing Visual Information Between the Basic and Superordinate Levels.Kosuke Taniguchi, Kana Kuraguchi, Yuji Takano & Shoji Itakura - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  11.  31
    Social Phenotypes of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: Similarities and Differences.Kosuke Asada & Shoji Itakura - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  12.  23
    Ostension affects infant learning more than attention.Yuko Okumura, Yasuhiro Kanakogi, Tessei Kobayashi & Shoji Itakura - 2020 - Cognition 195 (C):104082.
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  13.  61
    Understanding violations of Gricean maxims in preschoolers and adults.Mako Okanda, Kosuke Asada, Yusuke Moriguchi & Shoji Itakura - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  14.  51
    Intersubjective action-effect binding: Eye contact modulates acquisition of bidirectional association between our and others’ actions.Atsushi Sato & Shoji Itakura - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):383-390.
  15.  20
    Observing Others’ Gaze Direction Affects Infants’ Preference for Looking at Gazing- or Gazed-at Faces.Mitsuhiko Ishikawa & Shoji Itakura - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  16.  77
    Goal Attribution toward Non-Human Objects during Infancy Predicts Imaginary Companion Status during Preschool Years.Yusuke Moriguchi, Yasuhiro Kanakogi, Naoya Todo, Yuko Okumura, Ikuko Shinohara & Shoji Itakura - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  17.  57
    Young Children's Folk Knowledge of Robots.Nobuko Katayama, Jun’Ichi Katayama, Michiteru Kitazaki & Shoji Itakura - 2010 - Asian Culture and History 2 (2):P111.
    Children, in their everyday lives, encounter several types of humanoid robots. The purpose of this study was to investigate children’s folk knowledge of robots using the card-choice task. In the task, both adults and five- and six-year-old children were given nine questions concerning the biological and psychological properties of robots. They were asked to choose the appropriate stimuli from among five objects including living things, nonliving things, and a robot. The results revealed that the children tended to attribute certain biological (...)
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  18.  22
    Metacognition and mindreading in young children: A cross-cultural study.Sunae Kim, Beate Sodian, Markus Paulus, Atsushi Senju, Akiko Okuno, Mika Ueno, Shoji Itakura & Joélle Proust - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 85 (C):103017.
  19.  9
    The Categorization of Objects With Uniform Texture at Superordinate and Living/Non-living Levels in Infants: An Exploratory Study.Kosuke Taniguchi, Azumi Tanabe-Ishibashi & Shoji Itakura - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  20.  11
    Transition From Crawling to Walking Changes Gaze Communication Space in Everyday Infant-Parent Interaction.Hiroki Yamamoto, Atsushi Sato & Shoji Itakura - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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