Whistle blowers: Saints of secular culture [Book Review]

Journal of Business Ethics 39 (4):391 - 399 (2002)
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Abstract

Neither the corporate view of whistle blowers as tattle-tales and traitors, nor the more sympathethic understanding of them as tragic heroes battling corrupt or abused systems captures what is at stake in whistle blowing at its most distinctive. The courage, determination and sacrifice of the most ardent whistle blowers suggests that they only begin to be appreciated when they are seen as the saints of secular culture. Although some whistle blowers may be attempting to deflect attention from their own deficiencies and others may be disgruntled employees, the most serious instances involve a level of moral sensitivity that approaches religious proportions that are baffling for a culture that has dispensed with sainthood.

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References found in this work

Ethics and the Conduct of Business.John R. Boatright - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (6):446-454.
Business Ethics.Norman Bowie & Ronald Duska - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (9):718-728.
Business Ethics: Concepts and Cases.Manuel G. Velasquez - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):592-604.

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