Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):86-87 (2012)

Authors
Ben Jones
University of Nottingham
Abstract
In this commentary we suggest that Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) parasite-stress theory of social behaviors and attitudes can be extended to mating behaviors and preferences. We discuss evidence from prior correlational and experimental studies that support this claim. We also reanalyze data from two of those studies using F&T's new parasite stress measures
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DOI 10.1017/s0140525x11000987
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Facial Attractiveness.Randy Thornhill & Steven W. Gangestad - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (12):452-460.

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