Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):93-94 (2012)

Abstract
Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) parasite-stress theory of sociality is supported largely by correlational evidence; its persuasiveness would increase significantly via lab and natural experiments and demonstrations of its mediating role. How the theory is linked to other approaches to group differences in psychological differences and to production and dissemination of cultural ideas and practices, need further clarification. So does the theory's view on the possible reduction of negative group interactions
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DOI 10.1017/s0140525x11001051
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Darwinism and Human Affairs.Terence Ball - 1981 - Ethics 92 (1):161-162.

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