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  1. Safety, fairness, and inclusion: transgender athletes and the essence of Rugby.Jon Pike - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):155-168.
    In this paper, I link philosophical discussion of policies for trans inclusion or exclusion, to a method of policy making. I address the relationship between concerns about safety, fairness, and inclusion in policy making about the inclusion of transwomen athletes into women’s sport. I argue for an approach based on lexical priority rather than simple ‘balancing’, considering the different values in a specific order. I present justifying reasons for this approach and this lexical order, based on the special obligations of (...)
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  2. Elite Women Athletes and Feminist Narrative in Sport.Colleen English - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):537-550.
    A number of sport philosophers have noted the potential of sport as meaningful narrative and storytelling. While these arguments are convincing, they fail to acknowledge that not all athletes exper...
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  3. Altering the Narrative of Champions: Recognition, Excellence, Fairness, and Inclusion.Leslie A. Howe - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):496-510.
    This paper is an examination of the concept of recognition and its connection with identity and respect. This is related to the question of how women are or are not adequately recognised or respected for their achievements in sport and whether eliminating sex segregation in sport is a solution. This will require an analysis of the concept of excellence in sport, as well as the relationship between fairness and inclusion in an activity that is fundamentally about bodily movement. I argue (...)
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  4. Open Categories in Sport: One Way to Decrease Discrimination.Irena Martínková - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):461-477.
    Jane English, a pioneer in feminist sport philosophy, mentioned one simple idea that has received insufficient attention, but its consequences are of great importance for decreasing discrimination...
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  5. Unisex sports: challenging the binary.Irena Martínková - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (2):248-265.
    This paper addresses some problems arising with respect to the male/female binary division that has traditionally been central to most sports. One strategy for dealing with this problem is to remov...
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  6. Heroic Parthenoi and the Virtues of Independence: A Feminine Philosophical Perspective on the Origins of Women’s Sport.Heather Reid - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):511-524.
    Her name was Flavia Thalassia and she came from Ephesus. She won the stadion for parthenoi at the Isolympic Sebasta Games in Naples during Domitian’s reign in the late 1st c. C...
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  7. Plato on women in sport.Heather Reid - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (3):344-361.
    In a way, there is nothing surprising about Plato’s promotion of sport for women in Republic and Laws; it is logically implied by his philosophical theories. In another way, Plato’s vision of femal...
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  8. Transgender and Intersex Athletes and the Women’s Category in Sport.Pam R. Sailors - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):419-431.
    Issues surrounding the inclusion of transgender and intersex athletes in the women’s category in sport have spurred vigorous, and sometimes vicious, debate. The loudest voices on one edge of the de...
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  9. Girls Will Be Girls, in a League of Their Own – The Rules for Women’s Sport as a Protected Category in the Olympic Games and the Question of ‘Doping Down’.Angela Schneider - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):478-495.
    Recent debate by feminist scholars in philosophy of sport has been focused on the status of women’s sport as a protected category. Positions have varied significantly, from no need for a protected category anymore—to allow women’s sport to flourish and to give them a fair opportunity, given that men’s sport still dominates, just as it has in the past.It will be argued that: i) the concept of a ‘protected category’ is tied logically to the concept of fair play and has (...)
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  10. Women in Sport.Angela Schneider - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):415-418.
    The topic of Women’s sport has engendered increasing scholarship across differing disciplines in recent years; however, in the philosophy of sport literature, it has not been as abundant as it migh...
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  11. Gender verification issues in women’s competitive sports: An ethical critique of the iaaf dsd regulation.Mizuho Takemura - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):449-460.
    In 2018 the World Heath Organization decided to re-examine the classification of gender identity disorder and exclude it from being defined as a mental illness. This re-examination means that sex a...
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  12. Allyship in Elite Women’s Sport.Sarah Teetzel - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):432-448.
    Throughout 2019, retired athletes Martina Navratilova, Sharron Davies, Kelly Holmes and Paula Radcliffe all spoke publically about what they perceive to b...
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  13. Beyond Physiology: Embodied Experience, Embodied Advantage, and the Inclusion of Transgender Athletes in Competitive Sport.Cesar R. Torres, Francisco Javier Lopez Frias & María José Martínez Patiño - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 16 (1):33-49.
    In this article, we scrutinize views that justify exclusionary policies regarding transgender athletes based primarily on physiological criteria. We introduce and examine some elements that deserve...
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  14. Sexism or Fair Play.Sandra McCalla - 2019 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):259-273.
    It is true that not all women are born equal, and likewise, not all men are born equal, so before the game even starts, there are some athletes with longer legs, bigger hands and unusually high testosterone levels. These are natural properties and structures that have the potential to cause an unfair advantage. It is argued that since athletes are not born equal, natural properties should not be controlled or suppressed but ought to be considered as fair play in sports. (...)
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  15. Do Muscles Matter?—Women and Physical Strength: A Reply to Xinyan Jiang.Jay Gallagher - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):53-70.
    In Hypatia's 3, issue, Xinyan Jiang describes a failed experiment in sexual equality conducted during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. She believes the lesson to be drawn from it is that males will continue to have an advantage in societies requiring much physical strength. In contrast, I argue here that this failed experiment shows that the Maoist attempt to force women into men's roles was not feminist. American pioneers are cited as a counterexample.
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