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Sharon Stanley [4]Sharon A. Stanley [1]
  1.  39
    Toward a Reconciliation of Integration and Racial Solidarity.Sharon Stanley - 2014 - Contemporary Political Theory 13 (1):46-63.
    Both advocates and critics of racial integration have often depicted it as fundamentally hostile to enduring forms of racial identification and racial solidarity. This article questions the presumed antithesis between racial integration and racial solidarity through a sustained engagement with Elizabeth Anderson’s The Imperative of Integration, which depicts strong forms of racial solidarity as obstacles to integration that citizens must transcend in order to achieve racial justice. Contra Anderson, I argue that, especially under present conditions of racial segregation and inequality, (...)
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  2.  27
    Unraveling Natural Utopia.Sharon A. Stanley - 2009 - Political Theory 37 (2):266-289.
    Diderot's Supplement to the Voyage of Bougainville has often been read as a Rousseauian condemnation of modern civilization judged against the standard of pure Nature. A cursory reading of the Supplement does appear to present Tahiti as a natural utopia and Europe as a civilized prison. This essay rejects such a reading by demonstrating that the Supplement actually undermines any clear opposition between virtuous nature, represented by Tahiti, and corrupt civilization, represented by Europe. Although Diderot truly does offer a stinging (...)
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  3.  16
    Creolizing Political Theory in Conversation.Lewis R. Gordon, Anne Norton, Sharon Stanley, Fred Lee, Thomas Meagher & Jane Anna Gordon - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (3):363-392.
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  4.  6
    The persistence of myth: Brazil’s undead ‘racial democracy’.Sharon Stanley - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (4):749-770.
    This article addresses a recurrent tension in the literature on race and racism in Brazil. On the one hand, we find the so-called myth of racial democracy presented as the dominant racial ideology in Brazil, obscuring enduring racial inequality and thwarting the development of a mass-movement for racial justice. On the other hand, we find periodic announcements that the myth of racial democracy has definitively died. Accordingly, I theorize the myth of racial democracy as a paradoxically undead myth and ask (...)
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