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  1.  7
    Ethical Controversies of Familial Searching: The Views of Stakeholders in the United Kingdom and in Poland.Helena Machado & Rafaela Granja - 2019 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 44 (6):1068-1092.
    Familial searching is a technology that detects genetic relatedness. The term is generally used to refer to searches conducted in criminal DNA databases to identify criminal suspects through their connection with relatives. Beyond criminal investigation purposes, familial searching might also be used for the identification of unknown bodies and missing persons. The United Kingdom and Poland are cases that illustrate the variability of familial searching meanings, uses, and regulations. In the United Kingdom, familial searching is regulated by exceptionality and is (...)
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  2. Police epistemic culture and boundary work with judicial authorities and forensic scientists: the case of transnational DNA data exchange in the EU.Helena Machado & Rafaela Granja - 2019 - New Genetics and Society 38 (3):289-307.
    The exchange of forensic DNA data is seen as an increasingly important tool in criminal investigations into organised crime, control strategies and counter-terrorism measures. On the basis of a set of interviews with police professionals involved in the transnational exchange of DNA data between EU countries, this paper examines how forensic DNA evidence is given meaning within the various different ways of constructing a police epistemic culture, it is, a set of shared values concerning valid knowledge and practices normatively considered (...)
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  3.  23
    The (De)materialization of Criminal Bodies in Forensic DNA Phenotyping.Filipa Queirós, Helena Machado & Rafaela Granja - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (1):60-84.
    Forensic DNA phenotyping is a genetic technology that might be used in criminal investigations. Based on DNA samples of the human body found at crime scenes, it allows to infer externally visible characteristics (such as eye, hair and skin colour) and continental-based biogeographical ancestry. By indicating the probable visible appearance of a criminal suspect, forensic DNA phenotyping allows to narrow down the focus of a criminal investigation. In this article, drawing on interviews with forensic geneticists, we explore how their narratives (...)
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